Experimental Film Round-Up

By Zoller, Maxa | Art Monthly, September 2011 | Go to article overview

Experimental Film Round-Up


Zoller, Maxa, Art Monthly


So far, the year 20ii has produced many angry crowds. From the 'Arab spring' to the UK student movement, the relationships between the common, community and communication are shifting. In recent years, new terminology has found its way into the English language: 'crowd funding' financed the Obama election and The Yes Men's artwork, 'astroturfing' describes the appropriation of grassroot strategies by right-wing organisations like the Tea Party, and 'kettling' relates human crowds to the animal world through the herding of livestock.

In London a number of experimental film screenings responded to these issues. Raphael Grisey's The Indians, which was presented at no.w.here in May, is an inspiring meditation on the heterotopic space of protest. Based on the 2009 student occupation of Rennes University and including brief scenes of a lecture by the late Edouard Glissant, this poetic film invites the viewer into a surreal maze of anarchic knowledge. In his latest work Cooperation, Grisey collaborated with Malian filmmaker and photographer Bouba Toure and the agricultural Somankidi Coura Cooperative, which was cofounded by Toure in the 1970s. The two-screen film is a sensitive analysis of the relationship between the architectural, social, psychological and political spaces of a co-operative.

The question of what constitutes a community is the subject of Charlotte Ginsborg's new film Melior Street, which premiered at the Whitechapel Gallery. The main characters, local residents of Melior Street in east London, discuss their relationship to the city in individual monologues and personally performed songs, which gives this film a phantastical element. Melior Street shows that the pressure of survival in the 'capital of capital' makes it almost impossible to establish a local network, and therefore challenges the government's 'Big Society' scheme.

A different, but equally complex community is at the centre of Louis Henderson's work-in-progress Capital, which was presented at Practice Exchange, a student film screening at the BFI Southbank. Studying under William Raban, Henderson's work seeks to contextualise the recent student demonstrations in the UK in a wider history of protest, particularly the Paris Commune of 1871. Inspired by Raban's reflexive filmmaking as well as the essayist films of the Otolith Group, this work is an interesting example of the way in which a younger generation of filmmakers is currently fusing different film histories.

In contrast, Teboho Edkins CGI-based film Kinshasa 2.0, which was part of the Contemporary Africa on screen series at South London Gallery, deals with spaces where crowds cannot gather. Kinshasa 2.0 focuses on Marie-Therese Nlandu, a human rights lawyer and former presidential candidate in the Congo who was arrested, imprisoned and fled to the UK in 2006. The film follows her young niece who lives in Kinshasa, where she regularly enters the virtual space of Second Life to communicate with her aunt's fictional character.

Recent history has confirmed the political importance of online communities. As an immediate response to the Egyptian revolution artists, Celine Condorelli and Uriel Orlow presented Daniele Straub & Jean-Marie Huillet's seminal Too Early, Too Late, 1981, at Tate Modern in early February. Tate also introduced Mapping Subjectivity: Experimentation in Arab Cinema from the 1960s to Now (Reviews AM346), which included classics such as Ghassan Salhab's Phantom Beirut, 1998, and more recent works such as Akram Zaatari's split-screen video In this House from 2005. The extensive programme also showed The Mummy/Night of Counting the Years, 1973, Shadi Abdel Salam's meticulously photographed, eerie two-hour film about the looting of an ancient mummy cache in late 19th-century Egypt, has a durational quality that slows down one's heartbeat. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Experimental Film Round-Up
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.