Top 100 Business, Education, Engineering and Social Sciences Degrees Conferred on Hispanic Students

Diverse Issues in Higher Education, September 15, 2011 | Go to article overview

Top 100 Business, Education, Engineering and Social Sciences Degrees Conferred on Hispanic Students


Each year, Diverse: Issues In Higher Education publishes lists of the Top 100 producers of associate, bachelor's and graduate degrees awarded to minority students based on research conducted by Dr. Victor M. H. Borden, professor of educational leadership and policy studies at Indiana University Bloomington. This year, we've decided to expand our listings to focus on Hispanic students, in line with the Hispanic heritage focus of this edition of Diverse. Data for this analysis are included within the Completions survey of the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics' Integrated Postsecondary Education Data Set. This analysis is based on degrees conferred during the 2009-10 academic year.

All colleges and universities must now ask students if they are Hispanic. Anyone who is not a U.S. citizen or permanent resident who responds "yes" to this question is categorized as Hispanic. Anyone who is not a U.S. citizen or permanent resident is categorized as a "non-resident alien." All other individuals are categorized according to their answer to a second question in which they are presented with a set of racial/ethnic categories and asked to "check all that apply."

When responding to IPEDS surveys, college and university officials are asked to report the number of individuals who check only one category into one of five standard categories: American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian American, Black or African-American, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander and White. Anyone who checks off more than one category is placed into a new "two or more races" category.

Proportional distribution of racial groups
in the educational pipeline

                   Back   Latino   White
9th grade           16%    21%      63%
2008
High School        13%    13%      11%
Graduates

Enroll in          10%    13%      11%
College
Black

Total Degrees      13%    11%      76%
And Certificates

NOTE: PERCENTAGES ARE FROM TOTAL WHITE,
LATINO AND BLACK STUDENTS AND DO NOT INCLUDE
OTHER RACIAL GROUPS.

SOURCES: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU CURRENT POPULATION
SURVEY, OCTOBER 2008; NCES, IPEDS, 2008
HEADCOUNT AND COMPLETIONS FILES.

Note: Made by bar graph.

Current disparities in degree production
associate's and bachelor's degrees awarded
per 1,000 18-29 year-old's (2007-08)

            Whites &
            Latinos
            Gap

White       49.1
Black       32.0
Latino      21.7
Native      40.5
American
Asian       58.9
Pacific
Islander

SOURCES: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU CURRENT
POPULATION SURVEY, OCTOBER 2008;
NCES, IPEDS 2007-08: COMPLETIONS FINAL
RELEASE DATA FILES.

Note: Made by bar graph.

Current disparities in degree production
associate's and bachelor's degrees
awarded per 1,000 25-64 year-old's (2007-08)

            Whites &
            Latinos
            Gap

White       14.0
Black       12.0
Latino       8.9
Native      15.9
American
Asian       17.1
Pacific
Islander

SOURCES: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU CURRENT
POPULATION SURVEY, OCTOBER 2008; NCES,
IPEDS 2007-08: COMPLETIONS FINAL RELEASE
DATA FILES.

COURTESY OF EXCELENCIA IN
EDUCATION AND THE NATIONAL
CENTER FOR PUBLIC POLICY AND
HIGHER EDUCATION.

Note: Made by bar graph.

Business, Management, Market,
AND Related Support Services
UNDERGRADUATE

2010   Institution            State    08-'09   Men   Women   Total
Rank                                    Total

                                                Preliminary 2009-2010

1      Florida                Fla.       1018   523   640     1163
       International
       University

2      University of          Ariz.      1544   242   346      588
       Phoenix-Online
       Campus

3      The University of      Texas       449   233   106      439
       Texas at San Antonio

4      The University of      Texas       394   198   211      409
       Texas at El Paso

5      The University of      Texas       412   183   219      402
       Texas-Pan American

6      University of          Fla. … 

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