Color and Chaos in Paris

By Givhan, Robin | Newsweek, October 17, 2011 | Go to article overview

Color and Chaos in Paris


Givhan, Robin, Newsweek


Byline: Robin Givhan

Balenciaga's splashy spring collection brightens a day of surprises.

As even the most casual consumer of popular culture knows, the fashion world, at its white-hot core, remains an old-fashioned hierarchy--and nowhere is that pecking order more evident than in a fashion-show seating chart.

But that rigorously protected ranking unexpectedly crumbled as the spring 2012 collections began in late September in Paris, the capital of international style. As guests settled into their assigned seats for the eagerly anticipated Balenciaga show, a black-lacquer bench in the front collapsed, taking with it a line of designer-clad editors.

After two more coveted benches went down with loud crashes, show organizers feared that such glamorous guests as Catherine Deneuve and Salma Hayek--wife of the brand's corporate chieftain, Francois-Henri Pinault--might soon be splayed in a heap. The house asked the entire audience to stand, and thus the show began. When that first model appeared, we were just a bunch of folks watching some utterly glorious clothes pass by.

As designer Nicolas Ghesquiere took his bows, he mouthed "I'm sorry" for the furniture's failure, but really the audience should have been congratulating him for the upheaval. The aloof world of Paris fashion had momentarily become a little more democratic, a little less snooty, and no one suffered injury--except, perhaps, to the ego. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Color and Chaos in Paris
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.