Obama Tells GOP: Time to 'Do Something' on Jobs Bill; President in Campaign Mode, Boehner Says

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 7, 2011 | Go to article overview

Obama Tells GOP: Time to 'Do Something' on Jobs Bill; President in Campaign Mode, Boehner Says


Byline: Dave Boyer and Stephen Dinan, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Saying the fate of the economy hangs in the balance, President Obama on Thursday challenged congressional Republicans to think long and hard before voting against his nearly half-trillion-dollar jobs-stimulus bill when it comes up for a vote.

And the president, while saying he will maintain an open door for ideas from Congress, also said it's time for the legislative branch to do something on the top issue facing the country, which he said is high joblessness and a stumbling economy.

"Any senator out there who's thinking about voting against this jobs bill .. needs to explain exactly why they would oppose something that we know would improve our economic situation at such an urgent time

for our families and for our businesses "Mr Obama said at a hastily called news conference in the East Room of the White House."I hope every senator thinks long and hard about what's at stake."

His jobs plan would cut payroll taxes, extend unemployment benefits and devote new spending on construction projects - all in an effort to lower the national unemployment rate of 9.1 percent.

Senate Democratic leaders have finally moved to schedule a vote on Mr. Obama's plan, after scrapping the tax increases he had said would offset the $447 billion cost, and replacing them with a proposed 5.6 percent surtax on those with incomes of at least $1 million.

Mr. Obama said he was comfortable with the replacement tax.

Republicans have said the plan is likely to fail in the Senate and is dead on arrival in the House, where the GOP controls the chamber and has sent the president's bill to various committees for study.

House Speaker John A. Boehner, speaking Thursday at an event at the Newseum in Washington, said Mr. Obama has thrown in the towel on governing in favor of campaigning for re-election.

Nothing has disappointed me more than what's happened over the last five weeks, to watch the president of the United States give up on governing, give up on leading and spend full-time campaigning, the speaker said. No leadership from the president.

Late Thursday evening, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, Kentucky Republican, tried to force a vote on the president's original bill, but saw that effort fail when Democrats instead voted to change the traditional interpretation of the chamber's rules and block his efforts.

The dust-up threatened to further hinder operations in the upper chamber, where relations have deteriorated this year as Democrats have blocked Republican efforts to force votes, and the GOP has responded by delaying action.

In his press conference, Mr. Obama targeted both Mr. McConnell and Mr. Boehner for criticism for holding up the legislation.

If Mr. McConnell chooses to vote against it or if members of his caucus choose to vote against it, I promise you, we're going to keep on going, and we will put forward, maybe piece by piece, each component of the bill, the president said. And each time they're going to have to explain why they oppose individual elements. …

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