Obama's Secret Death Panel; Can the National Security Council Assassinate Americans?

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 7, 2011 | Go to article overview

Obama's Secret Death Panel; Can the National Security Council Assassinate Americans?


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Somewhere deep in the National Security Council, a death panel is operating without known legal basis, without recognized rules, without clear oversight and without public record or knowledge of its actions.

According to Reuters news agency, a committee composed of midlevel National Security Council staffers is in charge of compiling the death list of terrorists to be targeted by the CIA for killing. Their recommendations are sent to a principals committee for approval. The president then has the option of objecting to the names on the list, but if he remains silent, he gives his consent. This system reportedly was intended to protect President Obama but instead has created a growing political predicament.

The political question of whether the United States can wage a clandestine war against terrorists through the use of deadly force seems to have been settled. The type of CIA covert actions that shocked the conscience of the nation when they were revealed in the 1970s are now taken for granted, even lauded. It is a reflection of the dangerous times in which we live. But the question of whether these same deadly techniques may be used against American citizens has never even been debated. The matter has become acute since the CIA killed al Qaeda leader and U.S. citizen Anwar al-Awlaki in Yemen last week.

Even under the more permissive legal framework established by the Patriot Act and post-Sept. 11 policy directives, the due-process rights of American citizens, even those abroad and actively involved with terrorism, were supposed to be sacrosanct. This issue was debated and adjudicated from the first months of the war, beginning with the question of whether American citizen John Walker Lindh, captured in Afghanistan while serving with the Taliban, was given an adequate Miranda warning. …

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