>Preservice Elementary Classroom Teachers' Attitudes toward Music in the School Curriculum and Teaching Music

By Pietra, Christopher J. Della; Bidner, Sara et al. | Research and Issues in Music Education (RIME), September 2010 | Go to article overview

>Preservice Elementary Classroom Teachers' Attitudes toward Music in the School Curriculum and Teaching Music


Pietra, Christopher J. Della, Bidner, Sara, Devaney, Thomas A., Research and Issues in Music Education (RIME)


The purpose of this study was to determine the attitudes of preservice elementary education classroom teachers toward teaching music and the importance of music in the school curriculum as they prepare to enter the field in an era of high stakes testing, state standards, and accountability. More specifically, responses to twenty-nine statements were used to determine attitudes toward the following three constructs: (a) academic and social benefits of music education, (b) inclusion of music in the curriculum, and (c) comfort in teaching and leading music in the classroom. The survey instrument was a modified version of that used by Lewis (1991); therefore the current study was a modified replication. Results were positive for all the constructs. Post hoc analyses indicated a strong relationship between prior musical experiences and the strength of positive responses.

Introduction

Research has indicated that elementary general classroom teachers have traditionally played a role in the musical education of children and have had musical training as a part of their professional preparation since the early 19th century (Birge, 1988; Gray, 2000). Elementary classroom teachers and school administrators have had extensive preparation in many areas for certification; however, their required study of music is often very limited (Stein, 2002). Their attitudes toward music in the curriculum become critical to decisions regarding the music education of elementary school students. Weller (1991) documented the subsidiary position of non-core subjects, such as music, in which informants associated non-core subjects with an attitude of devaluation. This devaluation had a considerable impact on curriculum and instruction in a junior high school setting. Similarly, elementary classroom teachers' attitudes toward the music program may be an indicator of the value they place upon the importance of music education and the manner in which they support music education (Stein, 2002).

The responsibility for the music education of elementary school children is assigned by administrators to either (a) the music specialists or (b) classroom teachers (Byo, 1999). The support for music and other arts in the schools is a function of community values and the availability of resources. Resources have been in increasingly short supply for music programs beginning in the 1980s (Mark, 1986). A further downward trend in music funding has been documented (Bresler, 1993; Leonhard, 1991). This trend appears to be holding in that budget cuts and shifting priorities are either being enacted or pending in school systems nationwide to adjust to new accountability requirements (American Association of School Administrators, 2009; American Music Conference, 2003; Van Harken, 2003).

Preservice and inservice elementary teachers, while pressured to meet many curricular requirements such as state content standards (Cooley, 2002; Frykholm, 1996), are potentially in a position to implement music activities in their classrooms. Research indicates that there is a correlation between the attitudes of preservice elementary teachers regarding music and their inclination to teach music (Gelineau, 1960; Kretchmer, 2002; Lewis, 1991, Siebenaler, 2006). Likewise, level of comfort in leading music activities affects inservice teachers' attitudes toward teaching music (Colwell, 2008).

Classroom teachers have the most contact time with elementary students and may be the sole provider of music instruction or complement the instruction of a music specialist (Gold, 1973; Gray, 2000). Thus, their attitude toward music in the curriculum and teaching behavior are pivotal in supporting elementary students' music education (Music Educators National Conference, 1986). It seems apparent that the attitudes of preservice elementary classroom teachers are an important component of supporting music education in the elementary students' school experience. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

>Preservice Elementary Classroom Teachers' Attitudes toward Music in the School Curriculum and Teaching Music
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.