How Local Colleges Prepare High Schoolers for the Next Step

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 10, 2011 | Go to article overview

How Local Colleges Prepare High Schoolers for the Next Step


Byline: Larissa Chinwah lchinwah@dailyherald.com

Too many students are graduating high school without the skills needed to take on college-level course work, local educators and national statistics say.

While community colleges across the suburbs are developing bridge courses

short-term programs designed to quickly bring students up to par in subjects like math, reading and writing some say earlier intervention is critical to success after high school.

"We can't start the college-readiness conversation early enough," said Rich Haney, vice president for educational affairs at the College of Lake County. "Ideally it would be in middle school. We have been really focused on the issue of getting an early start on college. You can't wait for your junior or senior year to prepare."

According to data recently released by the Department of Education, 44 percent of students at public two-year colleges across the country are enrolled in developmental courses. At four-year colleges, 27 percent of students are taking developmental courses.

Data from the ACT program found only 24 percent of 2010 high school graduates were college-ready in all four ACT areas: English, reading, math and science.

In many cases, developmental courses often do not count toward a student's major but are needed before a student can take prerequisite courses.

At the College of DuPage, about 27 percent of the

students younger than 25 are enrolled in a developmental class.

Seventy-five percent of those students are taking a developmental math course. The college offers three levels, starting at the fifth-grade level up to high school-level intermediate algebra.

"It really is a waste for students on both ends," said Joseph Collins, executive vice president of the College of DuPage. "Sometimes they waste their last year of high school because they don't have to take a fourth year of math and then it's a waste at the college-end when they have to take a remedial math course."

Collins said the college is collaborating with the DuPage Regional Office of Education and six high schools on a pilot program to develop a math curriculum for high school seniors.

"I think the problem is a lack of alignment of curriculum what the students are taking at the high school level," Collins said.

"That's not aligned properly with what colleges and universities are saying students need to be successful."

Educators like Deborah Alheit, a math instructor at McHenry County College, say the adoption and implementation of the Common Core standards will simplify the alignment of high school and college curriculums when they take effect in the 2014-2015 school year.

"The Common Core is K-12 and should provide a better focus on the basic standards and benchmarks students should be reaching," Alheit said.

The College of DuPage is taking steps earlier to assist students who may be a few points shy of placing into college-level courses.

"Instead of waiting for students to come here in the fall and take a developmental class, the school will teach it in the student's senior year," Collins said. "Students will get it done and then sequence more smoothly to freshman year."

Similarly, McHenry County College is strengthening its relationships with high schools to ensure students know what to expect when they reach campus. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

How Local Colleges Prepare High Schoolers for the Next Step
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.