Lauren Lovette: An Infectious Stage Presence Has Put This NYCB Corps Member in the Spotlight

By Carman, Joseph | Dance Magazine, October 2011 | Go to article overview

Lauren Lovette: An Infectious Stage Presence Has Put This NYCB Corps Member in the Spotlight


Carman, Joseph, Dance Magazine


During New York City Ballet's last winter season, Lauren Lovette stepped into the mysteriously serene solo in Christopher Wheeldon's Polyphonia. The variation, originally choreographed for Alexandra Ansanelli and performed to Ligeti's haunting music, demands complete control, superb balance, and immediate authority. Lovette delivered it with such success that audience members were whispering, "Who is that?"

Though she is a petite 5' 4", Lovette moves big and has the requisite physical assets--long legs, strong, archedfeet, and graceful posture--that signal she's ready for anything. Her youthfully radiant face reads beautifully onstage.

"She shows a willingness to work in the studio," says Kathleen Tracey, a ballet master with NYCB. "And she has a wonderful disposition. She will do whatever is asked of her. A lot of people have that going for them, but she also has that 'it' factor--charisma, a natural glow about her when she performs. That's what separates her from the rest."

For Lovette, it's really just about getting to dance, which she loves to do. "The beauty of the solo in Polyphonia--what makes it so much fun to dance--is how slow it is," she says. "I could really think about every step. The challenge of it was my nerves. Being so nervous and it being so slow, I had to remember to breathe!"

Lovette was born in Thousand Oaks, California. At 10, she was whirling around her aunt's dancewear store when the owner of a nearby studio, California Dance Theatre, asked if she had taken a ballet class before (she hadn't). She started classes there and, when her family moved, continued her studies at the Cary Ballet Conservatory in Cary, North Carolina. At 13, Lovette was given a full summer scholarship to SAB. The next summer she stayed for the winter term. After she graduated in 2009, she became an apprentice with NYCB and a member of the corps de ballet the following year. …

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