The Obama Philosophy; President's Class-Warfare Credo Is All There in Writings of Reinhold Niebuhr

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 11, 2011 | Go to article overview

The Obama Philosophy; President's Class-Warfare Credo Is All There in Writings of Reinhold Niebuhr


Byline: Michael Prell, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Here's the problem with Mitt Romney. Sending Mitt Romney into battle against President Obama in 2012 is like bringing an MBA to a philosophy fight.

Mitt Romney is a nice man, a decent man. It's obvious that he's a good manager. That's how he positions himself. As a technocrat. A fix-it man. A turnaround specialist with a plan that's better than the other guy's plan, and a promise to bring better administration to the administration.

On the other side of the 2012 battleground is a philosophical warrior. You may not agree with Mr. Obama's philosophy, but he has one. It's there for all to see. Even self-described Obama Sap David Brooks at the New York Times now recognizes the Obama philosophy as Tax increases for the rich! Protect entitlements! People versus the powerful!

Some call that class warfare. I prefer to call it Underdogma. Whatever you call it, it's a philosophy.

These are philosophical times for America. The 2012 election will be fought on philosophical grounds. And nothing less than the philosophy - the idea of America itself - is at stake.

On one side of the battlefield is Mr. Obama. Ironically, it was Obama Sap Mr. Brooks, back in 2007, who first revealed candidate Barack Obama's favorite philosopher: Reinhold Niebuhr. Here is a taste of the philosophy of Mr. Obama's favorite philosopher:

In one sense, the opulence of American life has served to perpetuate Jeffersonian illusions about human nature. For we have thus far sought to solve all our problems by the expansion of our economy. This expansion cannot go on forever and ultimately we must face some vexatious issues of social justice. ..

If you think philosophy does not matter, you

don't know Reinhold Niebuhr - and you don't know Barack Obama

In less than three years, the Obama philosophy has all but destroyed what Niebuhr called the opulence of American life. The belief that we could solve all our problems by the expansion of our economy has given way to the Obama philosophy that we can solve all our problems by the expansion of government. …

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