How 'Bout Them Apples?

Newsweek, October 10, 2011 | Go to article overview

How 'Bout Them Apples?


For four decades, Steve Jobs created the gadgets and toys we use for work and play.

1976

Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak cofound Apple on April Fools' Day and begin building the first Apple computer in Jobs's garage.

1977

The Apple II launches, giving the Silicon Valley startup its first mainstream success and driving it toward an initial stock offering.

1983

With a price of nearly $10,000, the Apple Lisa is a flop, but it pioneers a graphical interface that will later find a home in the Mac.

1984

Jobs unveils the Macintosh, his "insanely great" project. With its mouse and user interface, the Mac redefines computing.

1987

The Mac II debuts with a color screen. Jobs is out of the company, but he's working on the technologies that will lead Apple's rebirth.

1989

Apple's first portable weighs nearly 16 pounds and sells dismally. Still, it paves the way for the PowerBook, which becomes a cultural icon.

1991

New models such as the Macintosh Quadra target high-end users, but as the 1990s wear on, Apple's fortunes begin to slide.

1993

Apple's first personal digital assistant, the Newton, is roundly mocked. Jobs discontinues it after returning to Apple.

1998-99

Now Apple's "interim" CEO, Jobs begins putting the company back on the map with candy-coated computers like the iMac. …

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