The Tech Seer


Steve Jobs wasn't always right, but his ability to foresee innovations was uncanny. Here are a few of his more remarkable predictions.

AN INTERNET WORLD When he called it: 1985

Back when computers were just becoming personally affordable, Jobs pointed to a future in which each machine would be tied to a nationwide communications network. "We're just in the beginning stages of what will be a truly remarkable breakthrough for most people--as remarkable as the telephone," Jobs said. In the same interview, he seemed to predict his own exile from Apple, saying: "I'll always stay connected with Apple. There may be a few years when I'm not there, but I'll always come back."

YOUTUBE MANIA When he called it: 2001

Four years before the invention of YouTube, Jobs pointed out that although many people consumed media online, they would soon start creating content, too. "One of our issues as a society going forward is to teach kids to express themselves in the medium of their generation," he said in an interview with Newsweek. "The medium of our times is video and photography, but most of us are still consumers as opposed to being authors."

STARTUP REVOLUTION When he called it: 1995

Early on in the dot-com bubble of the late 1990s, Jobs foresaw a new economic order in which lean and hungry tech firms would challenge the established giants of the corporate world. …

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