Editorial

By O'Sullivan, Grace | New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, September 2011 | Go to article overview

Editorial


O'Sullivan, Grace, New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy


I have just been reading the Clinical Workshops programme and was pleased to find it contains something for everyone. The vision of the workshops is to nurture growth from grass roots level by reinforcing the firm foundations upon which our profession is standing tall in various fields of health. This is a great opportunity for knowledge development and what is more enticing, the beautiful Bay of Islands is a prime spot to relax in between networking, meeting new colleagues and catching up with old friends.

In a similar context, this edition of the Journal has an eclectic selection of articles. With a key focus on research, we start with the work of Forsyth et al. This team of researchers examined the reliability and validity of the Model of Human Occupation Screening Tool. Speaking as editor, I am very pleased to publish this article which validates what was, the original work of the late Dr Gary Kielhofner. The next research topic comes from Brown et al. and this team compared the the discriminative validity of three visual perceptual tests. Manipulating visual information is a prerequisite to undertaking any activity, so this research has significance for many therapists. A more unusual piece of research comes from Robinson and Penman. Their study sought to understand the intricacies of teaching children to write. A must read for occupational therapists working in schools. Keller and Wilson take us into the realm of fieldwork experiences. Their research project, which explored the influence of fieldwork placements on recruitment following graduation, makes interesting reading. …

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