myId.com: Personal Security

By Brynko, Barbara | Information Today, October 2011 | Go to article overview

myId.com: Personal Security


Brynko, Barbara, Information Today


Think your privacy is secure? Think again. The difference between privacy and the world knowing your business is often just a click away. Remember Anthony Weiner, who resigned from Congress in June 2011 after his provocative tweets exposed more of himself to more viewers than he expected?

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"It's so easy to reveal all because it's just so easy to self-publish these days," says Denise Terry, marketing director of SafetyWeb and myID.com for SafetyWeb, Inc., which is now part of Experian Information Solutions, Inc. "Now it has become very difficult to keep facets of your life private that were otherwise very easy to keep private before Facebook and Twitter." Sharing sites invited users to open their lives to others, but ultimately, their intent is to share that information with specific people, not everyone at large.

Terry says myID.com is helping to bridge the gap between knowing and not knowing what personal information about you is wandering around on the web. She says the company, which was co-founded by Michael Clark and Geoffrey Arone in 2009, originally started with SafetyWeb, a tool designed for parents so they could monitor their kids' online activities.

But it didn't take long before parents wanted those same safeguards to ensure their own privacy. So in 2011, SafetyWeb, Inc. introduced myID.com. The tool remains proactive, checking blogs or changes in privacy settings on frequently used sites to keep personal reputations and financial data intact.

"If Facebook modifies its privacy settings, we automatically send out an alert via email or text message about the change," says Terry. "We can step in as a third party and say, 'Look, you really need to be aware of all the services that are collecting information about you, whether you know it or not. …

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