T-Shirts Commemorate Fun

By King, David | Information Today, October 2011 | Go to article overview

T-Shirts Commemorate Fun


King, David, Information Today


This latest and greatest column starts with a warning: Your Field Correspondent loves T-shirts.

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I have four drawers filled with them at home, plus some squirreled away for the winter or for some washing machine-related disaster. Not surprisingly, many of them are sports-related.

Among the favorites is a red one with an Albuquerque Isotopes logo. It's so red that it almost glows in the dark. There's also the well-worn commemorative one from the baseball venue at the 2004 Olympics, complete with stylized baseball logo, Greek script, and gyros grease stains.

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But for all those that are in the collection, there are oodles more that would be making a home next to Murphy Street Raspa Co. and The College of William & Mary basketball, except for a credit limit on my MasterCard.

No. 1 on the wish list comes from the National Baseball Hall of Fame, which has a collection it calls the Hair-itage Player Tees. Using team colors and outlines of players with notable head and facial hair (or in the case of some, no hair), the hall is selling a collection that pays homage to the Giant Afro Era (Eddie Murray among them) and the No Hair at All Period (see Jay Buhner). Of course, the most recognizable facial hair is the waxed mustache of Rollie Fingers, emblazoned in gold on a blue shirt.

If those aren't enough of a laugh, there's always the sports collection at www.bustedtees.com. No, there aren't Hall of Famers here, but there are some classic jokes, including a wizard in the classic pose of college football's Heisman Trophy with the words "Fantasy Football" underneath. Another, after our own hearts, is one of those classic Catholic images of Jesus, floating on a cloud with the words "Jesus Hates the Yankees."

One of the truly bizarre mascots in recent history is featured on a shirt for the 2012 Olympics in London. …

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