Libraries Commemorate 10th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks

By Goodes, Pamela A. | American Libraries, September-October 2011 | Go to article overview

Libraries Commemorate 10th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks


Goodes, Pamela A., American Libraries


A as many as 200 librarians were working in or near the World Trade Center and the Pentagon when the terrorist attacks took place September 11, 3001. Four librarians died on that tragic day--library consultant Lynn Edwards Angell, Helen Belilovsky of Fred Alger Management, and Maureen Olson and Margaret Quinn Orloske of Marsh and McLennan--while countless others lost colleagues, facilities, and collections. As the nation remembered 10 years later, libraries, vendors, and museums worldwide marked the anniversary with a variety of programs, events, and exhibits.

The Paramus (N.J.) Public Library, located approximately 10 miles from New York City, hosted its candelit Freedom Walk as a way "to remember lives lost, the bravery of first responders, and the soldiers who are keeping the nation safe." They also participated in Operation Goody Bag, a project that has shipped more than 200,000 packages filled with candy, letters of thanks, and poetry to military men and women, veterans, and first responders.

The poetry ensemble Collective Voices presented "Poems to Heal and Honor a Nation," a poetic and musical performance at the District of Columbia Public Library's Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library.

L. E. Phillips Memorial Public Library in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, hosted the "Pieces for Peace" quilting activity for children and families, as well as the program "Remaining Humane in an Inhumane World" with Robert 0. Fisch, a physician and Holocaust survivor.

Recording memories

Patrons at several locations were encouraged to record their experiences. Kitsap Regional Library in Bremerton, Washington, used its Kitsap Mall storefront space to allow visitors to record their thoughts on a memory board; learn about the Kitsap 9/11 Memorial project, spearheaded by Central Kitsap Fire and Rescue, which broke ground in a Bremerton park on September 11; and view the doaimentary The 102 Minutes That Changed America, which was being screened in a continuous showing. The Oliver Stone movie World Trade Center was shown at Indian Prairie Public Library in Darien, Illinois.

On display

Discussion opportunities took place at Lake Villa (Ill.) District Library, where patrons were asked to write down their memories of the terrorist attacks around a 9/11 book display.

Eastern Kentucky University Libraries in Richmond displayed newspapers and magazines in the John Grant Crabbe main library; other exhibits were on display at Westland (Mich.) Public Library and Waynesboro--Wayne County (Miss.) Library.

Staff at Baldwin ( N. Y.) Public Library presented a display case of books, magazines, newspapers, and memorabilia related to 9/11. Additionally, FDNY2001-2011: A Decade of Remembrance and Resilience, a new book with photos supplied by the New York City Fire Department, was on hand. The city of Baldwin lost 12 residents to the tragedy at the World Trade Center, including several firefighters.

Loudoun County (Va. …

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Libraries Commemorate 10th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks
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