Obama Jilts Israel for the Muslim World

By Muravchik, Joshua | Moment, May-June 2010 | Go to article overview

Obama Jilts Israel for the Muslim World


Muravchik, Joshua, Moment


Relations between Israel and the United States have reached their worst pass since the Eisenhower years, if not ever. The reason seems to be that President Barack Obama wants it that way. One of the chief goals of his foreign policy has been to improve America's standing in the eyes of the Muslim world. Toward that end he chose Al Arabiya, the Arabic-language satellite network based in Dubai, for his first presidential television interview. Soon after, he delivered a major address to the Turkish parliament and followed that with a speech to the Muslim world in Cairo last April.

That speech was filled with false analogies. For example, the president mentioned the right to wear the hijab no fewer than three times (an apparent reference to rules in French public schools and Turkish government offices that prohibit it) without mentioning once the far broader and deeper issue of the right of Muslim women not to be forced into hijabs or other extreme and awkward coverings. And he drew a parallel between the treatment of Coptic Christians in Egypt and the fact that IRS regulations do not grant tax deductions for donations to foreign organizations, which he said exemplified the invidious treatment of Muslims under American law.

The absurdity of this comparison was underscored by the very platform from which he spoke. He was co-hosted by Al Azhar University. In addition to being the preeminent seat of Sunni learning, Al Azhar offers degrees in engineering, medicine, even dentistry and pharmacology. But only to Muslims. It is a state-sponsored university, financed by the taxes of all Egyptians, but Egyptian Christians are barred from admission.

Obama's speech was interrupted repeatedly by enthusiastic applause, but despite his rhetorical pandering, the theme of regional commentary was that the Muslim world wanted to see him match action to words, especially for the United States to put distance between itself and Israel. So this year, Obama proceeded to grant their wish, ginning up a confrontation with Israel over construction in East Jerusalem by making demands beyond what previous U.S. administrations or the Palestinian Authority itself had required as a precondition for peace talks.

This same president who had ignored rebuffs and insults in order to keep an open hand extended to the rulers of Iran, Syria and Venezuela now gave the back of his hand to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

To be sure, Netanyahu is difficult to deal with, and his right-of-center coalition is unlikely to approve the concessions that Israel will have to make in any settlement with the Palestinians. But this is not what prevents peace. If the Palestinian body politic was ready for peace with Israel, either Netanyahu and company would change their spots or they would be swept from office, because the Israeli people want nothing more than peace.

The Zionists accepted the UN's 1947 partition plan. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Obama Jilts Israel for the Muslim World
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.