Seeing Double Regulation; Truth and Transparency about Truth and Transparency Act

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 25, 2011 | Go to article overview

Seeing Double Regulation; Truth and Transparency about Truth and Transparency Act


Byline: Michelle Minton, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

When asked to name the most controversial medical issues of the day, few people would pick eye care. However, in the past half-century, eye care has played a surprisingly important role in the battle for economic liberty. Now it is at the center of a brewing legislative battle.

It is the familiar story of a profession trying to get government to clamp down on its competitors. In this case, it's ophthalmologists going after other providers of eye care, such as optometrists and opticians.

The tool they are using is a proposed bill, the Healthcare Truth and Transparency Act of 2011 (H.R. 451), to address the alleged problem that some health care professionals are confusing patients with misleading statements. In a press release, the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) says the bill would make it unlawful for any health care professional to make deceptive statements or engage in any act that misleads patients whether in person, in advertisements or marketing efforts as to one's education, training, degree, licensure or clinical experience.

On the surface, that seems harmless and reasonable enough. Yet a slightly closer examination of the proposal shows that it is unnecessary, supersedes existing state laws and regulations and is based on the assumption that consumers are too stupid to figure out the differences between licensed eye care providers.

The bill would mandate disclosure of qualifications from eye care givers in all of their advertising materials and give oversight authority to federal regulators. This might create the impression that the market for eye care is an unregulated free-for-all, with consumers at the mercy of unscrupulous quacks.

In reality, the federal government already has the power to address false or misleading advertising under Section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission Act. Furthermore, every single state has a thorough licensing and regulatory scheme regarding what services each brand of health care provider may provide and rules regarding honesty in advertising and disclosure of health care provider qualifications.

Optometrists, the apparent target of the ophthalmologist-backed bill, are licensed to examine, diagnose and, in some states, treat eye diseases as well as other conditions that may affect the eye. An optometrist is a doctor of optometry who, after completing a four-year medical degree, then completes a yearlong internship followed by at least three years of residency. Ophthalmologists are licensed to treat and diagnose the full range of eye health issues.

Therefore, a federal bill requiring disclosure is redundant and unnecessary. One likely result of these regulatory redundancies would be an increase in operating costs for small eye care clinics, which would have to keep an eye on new federal health care advertising rules in addition to existing state and local statutes regarding advertising and licensing. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Seeing Double Regulation; Truth and Transparency about Truth and Transparency Act
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.