Women on the Prowl Still Get Caught; Sexual Politics Demeaning on Silver Screen and Off

By Fields, Suzanne | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 27, 2011 | Go to article overview

Women on the Prowl Still Get Caught; Sexual Politics Demeaning on Silver Screen and Off


Fields, Suzanne, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Suzanne Fields, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Ides of March, the slick new movie with George Clooney as an unethical presidential candidate is a morality tale for our time.

It lacks tragic dimensions, it's melodramatic without complexity of character, and it has a neatly constructed plot that has no emotional depth, sliding over the surfaces of the political world as we have come to know it, up close and personal. But it entertains as an engaging tale about the dirty tricks of politics. Entertainment, after all, is what politics has become. The title, if it means anything, is simplistically ironic because there is no Caesar to beware of and there are no political men deeply troubled over the abuse of power beyond their own resumes and getting their man elected. If Ryan Gosling, who plays a press secretary for the candidate, has the lean and hungry look of Cassius, it's merely a likeness in body image, not in intellectual profundity. His disappointment in his candidate's morals will hardly register with an audience that came of age with a popular president parsing the meaning of is and that witnessed a liberal candidate with good hair professing undying love for a wife who suffered from cancer while he fathered a child with someone else.

The movie's smooth-talking, hypocritical Clooney character is as familiar today as the political operatives who surround him, whose cynicism grows in proportion to the success of the candidates they support.

The tragic victim of the movie is Molly, age 20, a seduced intern (played by Evan Rachel Wood) for whom abortion is more of a deal-breaker than a moral decision. She is crushed less by power than by her own glib choices and the men who take advantage of them. She's simply not mature enough to understand. But that makes her representative of her sex at 20 in 2011. If there's moral insight here, it lies in the sexual relations as depicted not only among men in power, but in the attitudes of the women who work for them. More important than the cliches and the commonplace is the tragic dimension of a bright young woman as she is trivialized by powerful men. She accepts her trivialization as something as normal as the air she breathes. So much for women's liberation.

The movie, in fact, reflects the sexual mores of those who grew up after the second sex won equality with the first, when women were told they could cultivate the same sexual attitudes as men. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Women on the Prowl Still Get Caught; Sexual Politics Demeaning on Silver Screen and Off
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.