Stop Politics as Popularity Contests

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 29, 2011 | Go to article overview

Stop Politics as Popularity Contests


Stop politics as popularity contests

Political debates are a ruse orchestrated by the mainstream media for their own benefit. I am fed up with he said-she said politics that are prompted by the hosts to see who can get the largest viewing audience.

It seems that there are more serious issues facing the voters that require answers by the candidates, and I most certainly mean the Democrat candidate as well. How about seriously addressing the economy, foreign policy, the war on terror, jobs and a few other somewhat important issues that cannot simply be pushed aside hoping that they will take care of themselves in due course?

So, instead of addressing the real problems, the GOP candidates beat up on each other. How about some plain talk on these issues and giving us their stand on same so we can make an intelligent decision as to who can best serve the needs of our nation in the next four or more years.

The manner in which we conduct our entire electoral process has become futile, if not downright deplorable. It has come down to nothing more than a popularity contest, or the one who raises the most money wins, or who has the best appearance for TV, and certainly not to forget the "one" who can read the teleprompter in the most charismatic manner becomes the winner?

I want to hear about solutions to the issues that are shaking this country at the foundation. I want to be able to choose a leader who can bring us back from whence we came and I am going to bet the homestead that most Americans feel the same way.

We have a sitting president promoting his "jobs bill," which has already been defeated in Congress to the people on his (no, our) bus under the guise of informing the voters so he can get it passed when in reality it is campaigning for his re-election at the taxpayers' expense.

This what the quest for public office, and especially the highest office on the planet, has come to. Pretty sad, my fellow Americans.

Jerry Marchese

Wayne

Mayor can do more to limit tax rate

To St. Charles Mayor Donald DeWitte:

I write with great concern for all taxpayers. As you are aware, we have faced difficult economic conditions for several years now. The value of our homes continues to decline, according to most appraisals down an average of 35 percent since 2008.

While families continue to tighten their belts and find additional methods of cutting spending, you have failed to show similar leadership for the city budgets over which you have direct control or influence.

For example, you authorized pay raises for the unionized electrical workers of St. Charles this year, which will directly affect the tax rate next year. While our home values continue to decline, tax rates for the various taxing bodies just go up to ensure a constant, and ever-increasing, revenue stream for all government bodies.

Why not consider putting taxpayers first and negotiate the best possible return on taxpayer investment for such departments as the electric workers, similar to what is being done for the sanitation workers in the city of Chicago? There, the mayor is opening bids for sanitation services to private contractors in an effort to provide the best service to the taxpayer for the money.

There is no reason we taxpayers should be paying excessive union wages and pensions for electrical workers while private providers for identical services can be provided at a greatly reduced cost. …

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