Was China's Culture to Blame for Toddler's Tragedy?

Daily Mail (London), November 1, 2011 | Go to article overview

Was China's Culture to Blame for Toddler's Tragedy?


I GREW up in China, now a country making headlines everywhere because of the video of a poor little toddler being run over repeatedly and ignored by passers-by (Mail). As a Chinese, I am really ashamed of my country. China is a country which has 5,000 years of civilisation, a country where the traditional moral values are based on the Tao and Virtue. So what is making today's population act like animals and treat a dying toddler like a rat? Where has their virtue gone? Should we blame the child's parents who did not take proper care of her? Should we blame the drivers who ran over her but didn't even bother to stop? Should we blame the passersby who saw it all, but walked on without a second thought? Yes, they all should be blamed, but we should also blame the Chinese Communist Party (CCP).

Confucius's five cardinal virtues of benevolence, righteousness, propriety, wisdom and faithfulness laid the foundation for social and personal morality. With these principles, the Chinese culture embodied honesty, kindness, harmony, and tolerance. Since attaining power in 1949, the CCP has systematically destroyed the traditional values of China.

Anyone who dares to challenge its authority is imprisoned, anyone who dares to say a fair word for someone else who is suffering unfairly is punished. Samaritans are bullied, villains are promoted and money is viewed as the symbol of supreme power. …

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Was China's Culture to Blame for Toddler's Tragedy?
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