About the American Diabetes Association

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 2, 2011 | Go to article overview

About the American Diabetes Association


Since 1940, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has been the nation's leading voluntary health organization serving all people with diabetes. Our mission is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. Each year the ADA invests millions for diabetes research in addition to providing education to more than 25 million people annually through our programs and services.

Today, more than 25.8 million Americans have diabetes while 79 million have pre-diabetes. This translates to more than 1 million people with diabetes in Illinois.Recent estimates project that as many as 1 in 3 American adults will have diabetes by 2050, unless we take steps to Stop Diabetes.

Because the American Diabetes Association is the authority on diabetes, we received millions of visits to www.diabetes.org. On an average three month period, the ADA receives about 3.7 million visits to our websites. In addition, (800) DIABETES, the ADA's 24 hour call center provides individuals with personal information on diabetes, as well as ADA programs and events. Each year, more than 300,000 people contact us with questions and concerns, or to seek support or direction regarding diabetes and its management.

Locally, the American Diabetes Association of Northern Illinois reaches more than 100,000 community members annually through our highly successful outreach programs and events.Our signature programs include:

Diabetes EXPO, a free interactive one day educational event that provides thousands of people with access to diabetes-related products and services, head-to-toe health screenings, informational seminars and much more. Last year EXPO brought more than 8,000 health care providers, businesses, caregivers and people living with diabetes; under one roof with the mutual goal to stop diabetes. …

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