Our Lean Cuisine; IS ENGLISH FOOD HEALTHIEST IN THE UK?

The Mirror (London, England), November 3, 2011 | Go to article overview

Our Lean Cuisine; IS ENGLISH FOOD HEALTHIEST IN THE UK?


Byline: DAVID COLLINS

BLASTED as bland, stodgy and inedible, traditional English tucker has never had much going for it - until now.

It is hailed as the healthiest food in the UK, according to a study published by the British Medical Journal. It found that the English ate less fat, less salt and more fruit and veg, and said more than 20,000 lives could have been saved by other nationalities doing the same.

Researchers found that eight out of 10 deaths from diet-related illnesses including cancer, heart disease and stroke could have been prevented in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland if only people had tucked into the "average" English fare instead. But Dr Elisabeth Weichselbaum, of the British Nutrition Foundation, said: "People in England may have slightly better eating habits compared with Scotland, but the reality is that the whole UK population should improve their eating habits."

So can Cornish pasties, Yorkshire puddings and Birmingham baltis really be good for you? We put good old English grub to the test...

Menu

Snacks

Cornish pasty

High in saturated fats and can contain trans fats, which are bad for the heart

Should be freshly made with diced or minced beef and vegetables such as onion, potato and swede

Melton Mowbray Pork Pie

Lots of saturated fats which are a no-no for the heart

Not much that's good... but you could eat it with a salad!

Stilton cheese

Blue stilton is even higher in saturated fat than cheddar and is also high in tyramine, a chemical which can trigger blood vessels in the brain to give you a migraine

Lots of folic acid - the B vitamin which can be found in fruit and veg such as broccoli.

Colchester oysters

A high risk of food poisoning as they are typically served raw

Very high in zinc which is excellent for the immune system and rumoured to be a libido booster!

Main courses

Cottage pie

Made from minced beef, which tends to be the fattiest type

Carrots contain beta carotene, an anti-oxidant that cleans bad chemicals in the body. Potatoes are full of fibre

Pie and mash

Pie pastry is very fatty

The filling should be lean meat. Better to ditch the soggy bit at the bottom and just eat the crust. Can be full of protein and contain vegetables

Roast beef and Yorkshire pudding

The Yorkshire pudding is not so great as it's made from batter

Roast beef is good for you, being a source of protein and iron

Birmingham balti

Tends to be swimming in oil which will bump up the calories considerably

Because of the cast-iron dish it is cooked in, it comes with a very high iron content which helps people who are anemic. …

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