No Question of Authorship; Viewpoint

The Birmingham Post (England), November 3, 2011 | Go to article overview

No Question of Authorship; Viewpoint


Dear Editor, Professor Dobson (Post October 27 ) argues that the film Anonymous is merely a B movie. Sadly it is much more than this, and certainly not true that director Roland Emmerich has underlined the Oxfordian case.

The mainstream supporters of the Earl of Oxford as Shakespeare see the movie as profoundly dangerous, as the English de Vere society has made clear. They loathe the suggestion that their man committed incest with Queen Elizabeth. As to the issue of why people ask why Shakespeare wrote Shakespeare, the reality is that a powerful conspiracy theory has been developed which undermines the whole history of the Elizabethan period.

As James Shapiro said last year in his excellent book Contested Will, the authorship question is dominated by the denial camp - nine out of the ten websites he consulted said that Shakespeare was not the author. Shapiro has also pointed out that the film has insulted Queen Elizabeth I as much as Shakespeare. It portrays her as a sexually promiscuous jezebel who bore secret children. In fact the Prince Tudor theory on which the film is based provides the title for the film. The Earl of Oxford had to be anonymous because he was the son of the Queen and the unknown heir to the throne. This ludicrous conspiracy theory has gained support largely because the academic community has ignored it.

Alas ignoring absurdity only allows it to gain supporters. Fortunately there is something of a sea change taking place, and the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust is taking efforts to counter the denial camp particularly in the form of Anonymous.

It has set up a useful blog site and the ebook Shakespeare Strikes Back is a good starting point for discussion. Sadly the reason Emmerich got the financial backing to make the film is that the Sony corporation could see there was an audience for it. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

No Question of Authorship; Viewpoint
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.