Scattered: CDC Surveillance of Mental Illness

By Evans, Jeff | Clinical Psychiatry News, October 2011 | Go to article overview

Scattered: CDC Surveillance of Mental Illness


Evans, Jeff, Clinical Psychiatry News


FROM THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT

The substantial differences among states, age groups, races, and genders in recent surveys of the prevalence of depression and other mental illnesses in adults illustrate the importance of expanding the mental health focus of surveillance and information systems to help guide national and state-level planning, according to the report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The report describes the results of population-based surveys from selected CDC surveillance systems administered at different points during 2004-2009. The surveys indicate that southeastern states, non-Hispanic blacks, and women have the highest prevalence of depression, postpartum depression, serious psychological distress, and mentally unhealthy days per month.

However, these estimates of the prevalence of mental illness are limited by the generality of the surveys. None of the surveys, which include the state-based Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), and the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), was designed solely to monitor mental illness. They have instead "added components on mental illness gradually over time as recognition of the importance of mental illness in public health has increased," wrote Dr. William C. Reeves of the CDC's Public Health Surveillance Program Office and his colleagues (MMWR 2011;60[Suppl.]:l-29).

For instance, the BRFSS--a telephone survey of 450,000 adults in 50 states, the District of Columbia, and some territories--found a rate of depression of 8.7% in 2006 in respondents from 38 states, the District of Columbia, and territories, compared with 8.2% in 2008 in 16 states.

National results with NHANES data indicate a prevalence of depression of 6.8% during 2005-2008, with rates of 8.4% in women, 4. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Scattered: CDC Surveillance of Mental Illness
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.