Stopping the Slow Train to Disaster or How to Talk Up, Trick out, and Establish beyond a Doubt That School Libraries Are Vital for Kids (and That Means Teens!)

By Matthews, Steve | Young Adult Library Services, Fall 2011 | Go to article overview

Stopping the Slow Train to Disaster or How to Talk Up, Trick out, and Establish beyond a Doubt That School Libraries Are Vital for Kids (and That Means Teens!)


Matthews, Steve, Young Adult Library Services


The American Association of School Librarians (AASL) has worked hard to document how school libraries support student learning and provide guidelines and honors for exemplary programs--programs that showcase how a school library can make a primary difference in whether a school becomes truly effective at meeting its goals. Nonetheless, school libraries are being gutted, starved, and destroyed across the country. During her AASL presidential year, Nancy Everhart took to the road to demonstrate how learning thrives and students come alive in school libraries. See the account of her Vision Tour to highlight effective library media programs and see videos of the tour and the kids at http://tinyurl.com/aaslvisiontour.

As a result of the recession, school libraries are being closed, consolidated, and rendered ineffective by the elimination of staff. In addition, the federal No Child Left Behind legislation does not include school librarians as instructional personnel. If you followed the draconian and humiliating process that was put in place in the Los Angeles Unified School District to reclassify several school librarians as "nonteachers" (see "The Disgraceful Interrogation of L.A. School Librarians," Los Angeles Times, May 13, 2011, http://tinyurl.com/laschoollib), you get a sense of the desperation that school districts feel and the extreme actions that they will take to make cuts. Whether this is a trend or an anomaly, now is the time to demonstrate how the school library is not just an appendage, but an essential organ of any vital and optimally functioning twenty-first century school. This slow train toward disaster must be stopped, and that's where YALSA members can step up and make a difference.

This fall, ALA is launching a massive "School Libraries Matter" campaign to address this national crisis. How successful we are and how massive we become will depend on how engaged and committed ALA members are at getting out the message. YALSA, which counts school librarians as a quarter of its members, can be a key element of the expanding forward momentum of this campaign. YALSA, with its creative and tech-savvy ways, can be a critical partner, not only in broadcasting the essential role of school librarians, but also by helping to build a better awareness of how they work to build quality libraries that help teens learn and grow.

The Goals of the Campaign

* Increase public awareness of the impact of the loss of school libraries on students and student achievement

* Help local advocates save school libraries at the local district level

* Secure inclusion of school libraries with certified school librarians in the new federal ESEA legislation and inclusion of school libraries in the SKILLs Act

The Campaign Committee will be led by Pat Tumulty, executive director of the New Jersey Library Association and co-chair Susan D. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Stopping the Slow Train to Disaster or How to Talk Up, Trick out, and Establish beyond a Doubt That School Libraries Are Vital for Kids (and That Means Teens!)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.