Managing Stimulus Funding Performance: A Manager's Toolkit for Meeting Current Public Sector Challenges Should Include Collaboration Tools, Electronic Payment and Processing, Multivariate Analysis, and Balanced Scorecards

By Gooden, Vincent E.; Gooden, Linda R. | The Public Manager, Winter 2009 | Go to article overview

Managing Stimulus Funding Performance: A Manager's Toolkit for Meeting Current Public Sector Challenges Should Include Collaboration Tools, Electronic Payment and Processing, Multivariate Analysis, and Balanced Scorecards


Gooden, Vincent E., Gooden, Linda R., The Public Manager


In this new era of responsibility and accountability, the passage of economic stimulus funding--along with demands for successful government performance--presents contemporary challenges for public managers. The challenges demand that public managers rely on collective efforts, share collective responsibility and accountability, increase cooperation and collaboration, ensure compliance, broaden communication, and encourage continuity. To meet these challenges, managers should use tools such as increased collaboration and coordination, processing of data and payments electronically, multivariate analysis to assist in planning and making choices, and balanced score-cards to account for outcomes.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Stimulus Funding

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 is an economic stimulus package enacted by Congress in February. ARRA is intended to provide a stimulus to the U.S. economy in the wake of the economic downturn and is worth $787 billion. Basically, the stimulus includes federal tax cuts; expansion of unemployment benefits and other social welfare provisions; and domestic spending in education, healthcare, and infrastructure, including the energy sector.

Cooperation between agencies is key. However, this is not a natural process, because federal agencies must implement policy and manage budgets through discrete agency chains of command, not across the government. Federal agencies must learn how to cooperate more closely--a process that officials say is more difficult than it sounds.

Performance Management

Recently, Vince Gooden participated in the grant review paneling process to examine and rate proposals for one of the social welfare programs funded by the stimulus package. Ratings were based on how the applicants--local-level public, nonprofit, and private organizations--responded to published performance requirements, such as who is to be served, how they are to be served, who serves them, and how success and outcomes are measured.

Many successful proposals adequately described the need for services, cost effectiveness, and the extent to which they addressed performance requirements and emphasized coordination and collaboration with related services. Conversely, a number of proposals were poorly written, failed to address the proposal requirements, were not cost-effective, and showed no evidence of cooperative efforts with other service providers.

Collaboration and Coordination

The need for increased collaboration and coordination at the local level is nothing new. When surges in federal funding are made available to communities, such as in the Great Society, the need for collaborative efforts is more apparent. The Great Society was a set of domestic programs enacted in the late 1960s at the initiative of President Lyndon B. Johnson, including social reforms for eliminating poverty and racial injustice. Major ground-breaking spending programs that addressed education, medical care, urban problems, and transportation were launched during this period.

Local Human Resource Councils

In 1971, Gooden sent a letter to Elliot Richard-son, the secretary of the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW), about the need for local human resource councils that would include the U.S. Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), Model Cities, county welfare agencies, and the United Way. This model group would serve as the pilot for other agencies to follow as needed or as desired. The purpose of the council was to

* plan services to the community

* coordinate services provided

* eliminate duplication of services

* provide each other assistance when applying for funds

* provide joint information about future planning.

At that time, it was suggested that the ultimate objective of the council would be greater local agency autonomy over services and more services provided as unmet needs declined. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Managing Stimulus Funding Performance: A Manager's Toolkit for Meeting Current Public Sector Challenges Should Include Collaboration Tools, Electronic Payment and Processing, Multivariate Analysis, and Balanced Scorecards
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.