The Four Pillars of the Index

By Ramphele, Mamphela | African Business, November 2011 | Go to article overview

The Four Pillars of the Index


Ramphele, Mamphela, African Business


Safety and Rule of Law

"Having a firmly embedded judicial system that is just, effective, accessible to all, administered by competent and independent judges who work independently of political influences and in a corruption-free environment and make decisions according to merit, is a major prerequisite for ensuring safety and rule of law. Indeed, consideration of safety cannot be separated from an assessment of the entrenchment of the rule of law in a state. This accords citizens the right to safety rather than the mere presence of safety with no guarantees of entitlement. This extends to include the accountability of public officials and prevention, control and elimination of corruption in the country.

"Experience has demonstrated that a legal system can easily be subverted if its enforcers are not accountable to those they serve and if they are prone to influence through financial and other considerations. Furthermore, an empowered citizenry conscious of its constitutional and fundamental rights and responsibilities ensures the conditions for the entrenchment of the rule of law and safety in the state.

"To ensure maximum progress in the efforts to promote good governance in Africa, it is imperative to see to it that safety in its holistic form and the rule of law exist con-constantly."

Salim Ahmed Salim

Former Secretary-General, Organisation of African Unity and former Prime Minister of Tanzania; Member of the Board and Chair of the Prize Committee of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation

Participation and Human Rights

"In preparing an index illustrating outcomes in the areas of participation and human rights, it is clear that participation is much easier to assess and measure. Of course, participation encompasses and overlaps with areas of human rights, such as the right to vote, the right to a fair election, and freedom to express views on political issues and to hold government accountable for commitments made under national and international law."

Mary Robinson

Former President of Ireland and former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights; Member of the Board and Prize Committee of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation

Sustainable Economic Opportunity

"Sustainable Economic Opportunity is one of the four pillars under which governance is measured in the Ibrahim Index. Freedom to participate in the creation of economic wealth is a key right for all citizens and governments have an overwhelming duty to develop an enabling framework.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"This pillar seeks to measure, first, governments' abilities to manage the macro economy along sound lines to ensure broad economic development. It also seeks to measure the regulatory framework, which allows, inter alia, the wealth-creating private sector to grow within the constraints and interest of society as a whole. A third category of variables covers the availability of basic infrastructure, which in some cases is provided by the state, whilst in others by the private sector, within a system determined by governments. The final group of indicators cover aspects of rural and environmental issues. These are of particular significance, given the large rural populations of most countries, the importance of subsistence goods together with concerns associated with environmental degradation and climate change, which may become even more acute.

"It is encouraging to note that on average the majority of countries of Africa have consistently improved their scores in this pillar."

Lord Cairns

Former CEO, SG Warburg; Former Chairman, Actis Capital LLP; Member of the Board of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation

Human Development

"Human Development reflects the outcomes of investments made in the talents of a country, with a particular focus on education, health and social safety nets. Human Development indicators measure the efforts contributed by the individual, family, community and society as a whole to develop the human capital base of a nation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Four Pillars of the Index
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.