My Favorite Mistake

By Twilight: Breaking Dawn, Part 1. | Newsweek, November 28, 2011 | Go to article overview

My Favorite Mistake


Twilight: Breaking Dawn, Part 1., Newsweek


Byline: Mickey Rourke

Mickey Rourke on partying his way out of a career.

I made the mistake one time of staying out four nights in a row when I had to work. I'm talking four nights in a row! I was doing a movie called The Pope of Greenwich Village, which is probably my favorite film I've made, working with one of my favorite actors, Eric Roberts. After four nights of partying, we had a scene at a bar. Eric had all the dialogue. It was right after lunch, and I was so tired I said to the director, Stuart Rosenberg, "I think my character should sit." I said that because I couldn't stand. I put dark glasses on. Eric had to speak, and suddenly I was sound asleep. I almost fell flat on my face, but nobody knew about it until this day.

At the time, I was out chasing girls. There was a place called Heartbreak in New York that we used to go to. It was open until 4. I would pick up girls and drink and dance. That was the norm. I'd catch maybe two hours of sleep in the morning and nap at lunch. My career started in the '80s and ended in the '90s because of that nightlife. That was a mistake, burning the candle at both ends. You can't wait to get to where you have to get, and I took a fast dive off the mountain, and I wasn't even at the top. …

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