Moneyball; Drama

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), November 25, 2011 | Go to article overview

Moneyball; Drama


(12A, 133 mins). Brad Pitt, Jonah Hill, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Robin Wright. Director: Bennett Miller. Contains swearing and violence IN the sporting arena, money doesn't just talk, it chatters incessantly.

Success is measured by financial worth, creating an uneven playing field.

The best teams get richer by continually feeding off their smaller rivals until it becomes almost impossible to bridge the divide.

This was the situation facing Billy Beane, general manager of Oakland Athletics, in 2001 when his team lost the showpiece final game of the season to the mighty New York Yankees. With the taste of defeat still bitter in his mouth, Beane watched helplessly as bigger teams pilfered three of his star players leaving him to rebuild the team on a third of their payroll.

Painfully aware he couldn't compete on an equal footing with the big boys, Beane defied conventional wisdom and challenged the fundamental tenets of the game.

Moneyball is an inspirational drama that celebrates Beane's tenacity in the face of stinging criticism, inspiring his minnows to completely change the way baseball is played through unity, self-belief and a smattering of luck.

Director Bennett Miller opens his film at the end of the 2001 season with Oakland suffering that bruising loss to the Yankees. …

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