Female-Friendly User Interface Design on a Cosmetic Chemistry Web Learning Site

By Own, Zang-Yuan; Chen, Ding-Eei et al. | International Journal of Instructional Media, Winter 2011 | Go to article overview

Female-Friendly User Interface Design on a Cosmetic Chemistry Web Learning Site


Own, Zang-Yuan, Chen, Ding-Eei, Wang, Zo-Ie, International Journal of Instructional Media


INTRODUCTION

Simpson, Oliver (1) (1985) and Smith (2) (1992) indicate that male students perform better than female students on science-related courses, because male students apply computer skills more positively than female students. Therefore, to minimizing anxiety among female science students, creating a learning atmosphere and context which matches female learning patterns and experience, and enhancing interest among women in learning science, are all extremely important (Lin (3),2001).

PURPOSE

This investigation applies female-friendly design principles to increase interest in e-learning environment among women. All learning material was considered from a woman's point of view when designing the learning content, to help female students join the learning activity and improve their abilities, confidence and self-development. Previous studies on female specialties indicate the need to consider the principles of female-friendly web design, and provide female students with a suitable learning environment, when striving to improve learning performance. This investigation had the following goals:

I. Applying quantification to study the differences between a female learning environment and a general learning environmental under Internet-based chemistry lessons.

II. Applying quantification to explore the learning effect of different learning attitudes.

III. Applying context analysis to explore the students' satisfaction toward learning environment in the learning center, to ensure that the design of the website for female characteristics meets users' needs.

STRUCTURE OF RESEARCH

Designing the structure of website

[FIGURE 1 OMITTED]

[FIGURE 2 OMITTED]

BASIS OF THEORY

Building learning

Building learning theory researchers believe that learning is a process of building perception, where new information is linked with the learner's knowledge, constructing or reconstructing the learner's perceivable structure. Within an Internet-based learning environment, knowledge and concepts are presented by using media such as text, sounds, images and drawings. Hyper-links are applied to form a knowledge structure. The learner integrates the concepts into a new knowledge foundation, and uses the Web's interactivity and various information on the Internet. Knowledge is an initiative builder of knowledge instead of a passive one (Chou (5), 1999). Therefore, a well-established learning process should contain an environment which enables the learner to continue discovering new ideas (Yu (6),2001).

Building learning theory researchers emphasize sufficient teaching activities should be provided top help the learner. The two goals of "Assisted Building Internet Teaching" follow:

I. To meet the user's needs: Teaching software must meet the needs of both teachers and students. The teachers can use computer-assisted teaching to set questions, simulate real contexts and incorporate abstract ideas into a material, and enliven the teaching. Students can use teaching software to solve problems, understand concepts and practice self-learning.

II. Increasing learning effect: Internet teaching is a new information education trend. However, the effective use of features, management of the subject fundamentals and application of an effective teaching methodology must be considered when adopting education technology.

Collaborative Learning

Collaborative learning helps female students more than male students, according to Fu-Yun Yu's research on gender differentials in computer-assisted learning. Female students are more inclined to use collaborative learning than male students. Hence, collaborative learning helps female students to improve their learning achievement. Women are collaborative learners, who would rather collaborate than compete in learning (Hayes and Smith (9),1994). J. Coates (10) discovered that women are mainly concerned with interaction (1986), such as group discussion, spontaneous listening, self-discovery and topic discussion (Hayes (11),1989). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Female-Friendly User Interface Design on a Cosmetic Chemistry Web Learning Site
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.