Weekly Fish Dish Good for Brain

The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia), December 3, 2011 | Go to article overview

Weekly Fish Dish Good for Brain


Eating baked or grilled fish on a weekly basis may improve brain health and reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

A decade-long study of 260 healthy people found eating baked or grilled fish each week helped preserve grey matter volumes a crucial to brain health a and increased levels of cognition. Eating fried fish did not have the same effects.

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh said their study was the first to establish a direct relationship between eating fish, brain structure and Alzheimer's risk.

aThe results showed that people who consumed baked or broiled (grilled) fish at least once a week had better preservation of grey matter volume on MRI in brain areas at risk of Alzheimer's disease,a researcher Cyrus Raji said.

Creative people are more likely to cheat than less creative people, psychologists believe.

Researchers from Harvard University and Duke University carried out a series of experiments to see if more creative people would cheat under circumstances where they could justify their bad behaviour.

Participants were paid a small sum for showing up and were given tasks for which they could be paid more if they cheated.

The more creative types were significantly more likely to cheat than other participants.

aThe results ... indicate that, in fact, people who are creative or work in environments that promote creative thinking may be the most at risk when they face ethical dilemmas,a the researchers wrote in their study, published by the American Psychological Association.

Having depression could raise your heart attack chances.

The theory is based on a Canadian study which found depressed people take longer to recover from exercise compared to those who are not depressed.

The study's authors suggested there was a dysfunctional biological stress system at play among depressed individuals, who they said should be tested for cardiovascular disease.

aThere have been two competing theories as to why depression is linked to cardiovascular disease,a lead researcher Jennifer Gordon, of McGill University, said.

aDepressed people may have poorer health behaviours, which may in turn lead to heart problems. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Weekly Fish Dish Good for Brain
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.