Clothing Color Preferences of Boys and Girls Aged between Six and Nine

By Kilinc, Nurgul | Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal, November 2011 | Go to article overview

Clothing Color Preferences of Boys and Girls Aged between Six and Nine


Kilinc, Nurgul, Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal


Owing to increasing competition and a surfeit of products, it is becoming increasingly difficult for businesses to reach consumers, and the criteria that dictate consumers' preferences have become an important subject of analysis. Indeed, important empirical and theoretical studies of consumer behavior have been performed since the 1960s in order to understand the ways in which consumers show interest in products (O'Cass, 2000).

As a result of the psychological effects of color on human beings its use has become an important marketing tool. Of course, color is not the only factor that is important when companies try to sell a product, but it is one factor that attracts the customer, and if the wrong color is used the product will be less likely to sell. In fact, color is ranked among the top three considerations in the purchase decision (Leichtling, 2002). Therefore, producers and marketers who would like to extend their customer portfolio have to consider the importance of colors in marketing.

According to Liu and Ma (2007) contemporary consumption of clothing is not only necessary to meet physical needs but also to meet emotional and cultural needs. It is widely accepted that colors have an impact on feelings and emotions (Kaya & Epps, 2004). Consequently, use of colors in clothing is quite significant in terms of meeting the emotional needs of consumers. According to Bulgun (2000) the colors used in clothing give an indication of people's moods. Additionally, Read and Upington (2009) found that there is a correlation between the color preferences and feelings of children.

Because color is both the most striking and the most memorable characteristic of clothing, it is seen as one of the most significant factors affecting people when they choose clothing (Altintac & Agac, 2008). The fact that the different colors of materials used in the same models noticeably affect sales is an indicator of the significance of the color concept in the fashion industry. The power of color is a significant marketing tool in the fashion industry. The impact of color in marketing informs the decisions of clothing producers, marketing departments, and retailers with regard to future product ranges (Moore, Cassill, Herr, & Williamson, 2001). If clothing firms do not work with appropriate data on prediction of color trends or cannot interpret such data well, they will find themselves at a disadvantage compared with their competitors. Because color cannot be corrected at the marketing stage, producers cannot afford to make any mistakes (Altintac & Agac, 2008).

Valkenburg and Cantor (2001) and Koksal (2007) suggested that children start shopping independently after the age of five and independent shopping gradually increases as their age increases. Nowadays, children are active customers (Darian, 1998). Children have a particular impact on family decisions related to clothing purchases in shopping centers. The proportion of the family budget spent on children's clothing has gradually been increasing (Sakarya, 2009) and children's clothing currently comprises the fastest growing product group in the clothing sector. Most children's clothing manufacturers conduct extensive research to identify the needs, interests, and demands of child consumers (Agac & Harmankaya, 2009). This research guides the future production of businesses in an intensely competitive environment and plays a significant role in ensuring that businesses retain their position in the sector. The aim in this study was to identify the color preferences of girls and boys aged between 6 and 9, to determine whether the colors that children prefer are different according to clothing type, sex, and age. A second aim in the study was to provide data for designers of children's apparel.

METHOD

PARTICIPANTS

The research was conducted between April 2010 and July 2010 with 628 children (312 girls and 316 boys) from Konya, Turkey. …

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