Andrew Walmsley on Digital: Don't Expect a Peaceful 2012

Marketing, December 7, 2011 | Go to article overview

Andrew Walmsley on Digital: Don't Expect a Peaceful 2012


The pace of change is relentless as digital transforms consumers' lives, and not always for the better.

This hasn't been the year when things slowed down. There has been no shortage of novel stuff to talk about in 2011, and established themes to revisit in the light of the new. So how did I do? Were there howlers? Successes?

In January, I wrote about how little attention online retailers pay to delivery - 26% of orders require a signature on delivery but don't warn of this, and many don't provide space for notes, such as 'leave with neighbour' (see 30 seconds on ...).

As my online Christmas purchasing goes into overdrive, this is still a big issue that is poorly addressed.

I covered Groupon, enthusing about its zero working-capital business model.

Then I slagged it off in May for failing to segment its audience, sending me daily offers for fish pedicures and vajazzles.

Great innovative business, terrible delivery.

I can't work out why the IPO went OK - it raised dollars 700m, though its share price has fallen 40% since - I suspect it is not the business we hoped.

Stalketing, the creepy and tactless use of retargeting and other data techniques, came up. We are still seeing an irritating lack of common sense in how these technologies are applied, and this risks a consumer backlash for us all.

I also wrote about how, in the digital age, the traditional pitch is unsuited to the multilayered business relationship with agencies, and I predicted the demise of this way of choosing an agency. Not yet, says the market, still hanging on to the beauty parade.

In February, I predicted the decline of the app, as the mobile web grew I still think I am right, even though there is seemingly no let-up in the levels of investment in pointless apps. The mobile web is growing fast, even though easyJet still hasn't caught up.

It remains a criminal offence to disguise selling as content without disclosure. Six months on from writing about the two-year prison sentence it attracts, I am still hearing about incidences of this, particularly with bloggers.

In shock news this summer, I was ousted as Mayor of the Cumberland Pencil Museum, a post I had held proudly on Foursquare since October 2010. It was a good run.

I still love the Wheretheladies.at iPhone app, which uses a Foursquare feed to power a pointer indicating in which direction the, er, ladies are at. It answered a fundamental human need, seeking out Mrs Right (or at least Mrs Right Now). Aislefinder did much the same with your groceries - less fun, but probably more money in it.

People Lacking Everyday Basic Skills apparently can't boil an egg, change a tyre or hem trousers. While 72% of 18- to 24-year-olds know how to join a wi-fi network, just 9% can poach an egg.

SCVNGR (pronounced 'scavenger') aimed to build a game layer on the world, allowing organisations and individuals to create challenges, games and rewards for people who participate. …

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