Interview: Bob Schieffer

By Grove, Lloyd | Newsweek, December 12, 2011 | Go to article overview

Interview: Bob Schieffer


Grove, Lloyd, Newsweek


Byline: Lloyd Grove

At 74, the new king of the Sunday shows calls himself an 'old man.' Here's what keeps him in the hunt.

This fall your ratings on Face the Nation have snowballed, beating or tying NBC's Meet the Press many weeks in the all-important 25-54 demographic, while ABC's This Week remains stuck in third place. What are your competitors doing wrong? I think we're succeeding because we made the decision that we're going to try to cover the campaigns. It's just a great story--exciting and exasperating--and we're just staying with it.

What's the purpose of these Sunday shows? They've become what the supercolumnists were when I came to Washington. In those days you had Scotty Reston, Joe Kraft, and Walter Lippmann, and people would float ideas to these columnists and then Washington would spend the next week debating them. Nobody has time for that anymore.

Why won't your CBS bosses give you a regular hour on Sunday, like the others, instead of the measly half-hour you have? I can't give you an answer to that question. But I hope that at least some of the time during this campaign season we'll be able to go to an hour. …

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