He Snubbed War Heroes, but One Cause He DID Fight for Was Doubling MPs' Pay

Daily Mail (London), December 8, 2011 | Go to article overview

He Snubbed War Heroes, but One Cause He DID Fight for Was Doubling MPs' Pay


Byline: Sam Greenhill

WHILE dismissing the virtue of an Arctic convoy medal, Andrew Robathan is a firm believer in another cause: the 'need' to almost double MPs' salaries.

He has argued passionately for parliamentarians to be paid up to [pounds sterling]110,000 a year, nearly twice as much as they currently earn.

The long-serving MP says military medals should only be awarded for 'risk and rigour' - but thinks a pay rise for MPs would attract a certain 'sort of people' to the Commons.

His controversial call came in the wake of the expenses scandal of 2009, and triggered an outcry from voters.

But Mr Robathan, 60, has never shied away from confrontation, having served in the SAS before entering politics.

He became Conservative MP for Blaby in 1992, and demonstrated political acumen by being one of the first MPs to back David Cameron for leader of the party, for which he was rewarded with a paid post in the Shadow Cabinet as the Tories' deputy chief whip.

But in 2009 he was forced to defend his expenses as one of the MPs claiming the maximum second home allowance. …

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