Pretty as a Postcard; Merseyside Tales

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), December 10, 2011 | Go to article overview

Pretty as a Postcard; Merseyside Tales


Byline: Stephen Guy

THE holidaymaker was enjoying his stay at New Brighton and chose a colourful postcard to send to a friend in Yorkshire. It was the Whitsuntide weekend of 1913 and an A.C wrote to Janet in Huddersfield: "Frank and the girls have played on the sands while Dad and I have been to the top of the tower.

"We have also seen the ship called Mauretania sail for New York."

It must have been a marvellous sight to see the great liners and other vessels from the lofty heights of New Brighton Tower. The Cunard Line's Mauretania and her doomed sister Lusitania were very popular on the Mersey.

Big crowds would gather on the shoreline to catch a glimpse of these leviathans loaded with passengers travelling to and from America.

New Brighton was a great vantage point and the Tower the best grandstand of all. Queues would form for a trip to the top - particularly at high tide when the big ships were coming and going at the quaysides.

Like the Lusitania, New Brighton Tower had a short life. Work began on its construction in 1896 at about the time the promenade was being built.

The 562 ft high Tower opened in 1900 and at was slightly higher than Blackpool Tower which could be seen on a clear day on the other side of Liverpool Bay.

It was a big attraction in New Brighton which was thronged with day trippers and people staying in the many hotels and boarding houses that filled the resort. …

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