Patients' Group Attacks Presumed-Consent Plan; 'STATE ACQUISITION WOULD REPLACE ORGAN DONATION'

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), December 12, 2011 | Go to article overview

Patients' Group Attacks Presumed-Consent Plan; 'STATE ACQUISITION WOULD REPLACE ORGAN DONATION'


Byline: DAVID WILLIAMSON

WELSH Government plans to introduce "presumed consent" for organ donations were today condemned by Patient Concern as a system of "state acquisition".

The group claimed the proposals would turn patients into "conscripts or conscientious objectors" in a "tragic" move. The uncompromising attack on the Welsh Government's plans for a system under which people would be assumed to consent to having their organs donated unless they "opt-out" comes on the same day that the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (Nice) publishes new guidelines.

It recommends organ donation should be considered a "usual part of end-of-life care planning, and that each hospital should have a policy and protocol" for identifying potential donors and managing the consent process.

"It also states that "in all cases those close to the patient should be approached in a professional, compassionate and caring manner and be given sufficient time to consider the information they have been offered."

Roger Goss of Patient Concern, said: "Nice's guidance reflects the core principle of organ donation - a truly altruistic gift based on fully informed consent.

It is tragic that Welsh Assembly proposed legalisation, if enacted, would destroy 'donation', replacing it with state requisition.

"The Welsh would automatically be treated as willing donors unless they, or their family, could prove otherwise. Everyone would be turned into conscripts or conscientious objectors.

"England would be the next target, regardless of our horrible history of organs being taken by the tens of thousands without permission. It was this scandal that resulted in our Human Tissue Act which ensures that donation always reflects a willing informed choice.

"The Welsh Assembly needs to reconsider whether legalising presumed consent to organ donation is desirable, let alone is ethical."

Mr Goss's words echo controversial comments made by Archbishop of Wales Dr Barry Morgan who, in September, said plans to introduce presumed consent to the organ donation law would turn "volunteers into conscripts". …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Patients' Group Attacks Presumed-Consent Plan; 'STATE ACQUISITION WOULD REPLACE ORGAN DONATION'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.