Internal Medicine and Family Medicine Physicians' Perceptions of Speech-Language Pathology

By Jeanne, Nancy; Phillips, Daniel et al. | Journal of Medical Speech - Language Pathology, December 2011 | Go to article overview

Internal Medicine and Family Medicine Physicians' Perceptions of Speech-Language Pathology


Jeanne, Nancy, Phillips, Daniel, Molt, Lawrence, Journal of Medical Speech - Language Pathology


Survey data were collected from internists and family medicine physicians in Alabama regarding their perceptions of and their working relationship with speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in medical settings. Of the 500 randomly selected physicians within the state of Alabama, 145 (29%) responded. This encouraging response rate illustrated that, overall, the results were positive in the physicians understanding and view of medical SLPs.

Keywords: survey, physician, speech-language pathology, perceptions, and partnership

INTRODUCTION

According to the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics, as of 2007, the American Medical Association had reported that 32.5 of active physicians in patient care could be accounted for by the specialties with internal medicine accounting for 20.1% and family medicine accounting for 12.4% (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2010). Approximately 39% of certified speech-language pathologists (SLPs) work in health care and social assistance (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2009). A strong partnership between these primary care physicians and the SLPs is vital for appropriate service delivery to patients in need of assessment and intervention for communication or swallowing problems. With the exception of one investigation conducted 30 years ago (McClausin, Florance, & Rabidoux, 1980), no studies have been published with the specific focus on how medical SLPs are perceived by physicians.

The McClausin et al. (1980) study surveyed 17 family practice residents in Columbus, Ohio, with regard to their knowledge of the professional services of SLPs. Their preliminary results suggested that although some of the physicians were familiar with SLPs' scope of practice at that time, more than half were uncertain of SLPs' level of education and training and were generally unable to identify how to make patient referrals for SLPs' services. Two other studies have been identified that included surveys of physicians; however, these targeted therapy services rather than the profession. Lesser and Hassip (1986) surveyed teachers, doctors, and nurses about their opinion and knowledge base with regard to speech therapy. Moran and Pentz (1987) surveyed otolaryngologists' opinion of voice therapy for vocal nodules in children. The current investigation sought to compare and expand on the original survey by McClausin et al. (1980) and to address questions regarding the SLP profession's progress in partnering with primary care physicians since 1980.

METHOD

A mailing list of 500 specialists in internal medicine or family medicine was randomly generated from a listing of Alabama's Medical Association's public website. The 145 participants in this investigation decided to respond to a survey that was sent to them via regular mail service. The authors had decided to use the regular mail service rather than electronic mail in an attempt to minimize a bias in the respondents5 years of practice.

The survey instrument consisted of 20 closed-answer questions, such as, yes/no, single-answer multiple-choice, and multiple-answer multiple-choice questions (see Appendix A). Three main topics were covered within these 20 questions: (1) demographics of the physician respondent, (2) the respondent's familiarity with SLPs' scope of practice in medical settings, and (3) the respondent's current relationship (if any) with SLPs in medical settings.

RESULTS

In the random selection process 317 surveys, were mailed to specialists in internal medicine, and 183 surveys were mailed to specialists in family medicine. Of the 145 who responded to the survey, 85 were from internal medicine, and 60 were from family medicine. The data obtained from our 145 respondents (29%) are primarily descriptive with the application of nonparametric measures for some of the comparisons of interest.

Demographic Information

The typical physician respondent was a male (83%) internist (58%) in practice for 16 or more years (72%). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Internal Medicine and Family Medicine Physicians' Perceptions of Speech-Language Pathology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.