T-U 2

By Smits, Garry | The Florida Times Union, November 25, 2011 | Go to article overview

T-U 2


Smits, Garry, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Garry Smits

BOWLING, OLD SCHOOL-STYLE

Remember when there was no BCS? With the college football season as convoluted as ever, here's what the major bowl matchups might be, and what kind of national champion it might produce, if we went back about 20 years:

Rose Bowl: Automatic - Pac-10 champion (let's assume Stanford) against the Big Ten champion (the call here is Michigan State).

Orange Bowl: The Big 12 champion used to be here every year. I still like Oklahoma to really dampen Oklahoma State's season. Alabama, as SEC West runner-up, would look best.

Sugar Bowl: If LSU wins the SEC, the Tigers would wind up here, as Bear Bryant ordained years ago for the SEC champion. This year, I'd like Michigan at 10-2 to play.

Fiesta Bowl: This year, if there were no bowl system, the game likely would get the Pac-10 runner-up (Oregon, by my estimation) vs. Oklahoma State. Nice game.

Now the scramble begins among the next-tier bowls.

Notice how I left out the ACC champion. Tough. That used to happen quite a lot. Hello Gator Bowl or Chick-Fil-A Bowl, to Virginia Tech vs. Notre Dame or Clemson vs. Penn State. The Capital One Bowl would pick either Arkansas or Georgia to maybe play Nebraska. The Cotton Bowl would match Houston against either Wisconsin or Kansas State.

LSU would beat Michigan to win the national championship, anyway. But notice how many good games there are. Funny how a little anarchy would work.

2 CENTS

HAZING SCANDAL LEAVES A DARK CLOUD OVER FAMU

The Florida A&M band is the only college band in America that dwarfs the football team - to the point where FAMU football coaches understand that they're going to have to swallow a few delay-of-game penalties to start the second half of home games because the band played past its allotted time. …

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