The [Pounds Sterling]70 Cup of Coffee with a Dirty Secret; Sumatran Civet T Droppings Are the Key to Rich Frothy Flavour

The Evening Standard (London, England), December 16, 2011 | Go to article overview

The [Pounds Sterling]70 Cup of Coffee with a Dirty Secret; Sumatran Civet T Droppings Are the Key to Rich Frothy Flavour


Byline: Alistair Foster

IF the price per cup does not make your eyes water, perhaps the process through which it is made will.

Britain's most expensive cup of coffee is to go on sale in London at [pounds sterling]70 a cup, but the secret behind its complex flavour is that it is made from animal droppings.

Kopi Luwak coffee is produced on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, where native civet-like creatures called luwaks eat red, ripe coffee cherries. After digesting the fruit pulp, they excrete the beans, which they cannot digest. These beans are extremely rare and only about 450lb per year are harvested.

The animals are said to be able to pick the finest coffee cherries and their digestive juices ferment the beans, adding flavour.

The coffee will go on sale at new venue DSTRKT near Piccadilly, which opened this week after a [pounds sterling]25 million renovation. The site, which is the former basement of Planet Hollywood and lounge bar of the Rex Cinema knocked together, incorporates a bar, restaurant and nightclub.

Operations manager and partner Fraser Donaldson said: "It's not a gimmick.The beans actually make a really, really nice cup of coffee.

"The way it is made might put some people off, but it will certainly wake you up at 10 o'clock at night. We are the only people in the UK to sell it, with the next nearest place the Ritz Carlton in Paris. …

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