Lauding Libertarianism

By Jasper, William F. | The New American, December 5, 2011 | Go to article overview

Lauding Libertarianism


Jasper, William F., The New American


Jacob G. Hornberger is founder and president of the Future of Freedom Foundation. He was born and raised in Laredo, Texas, and received his B.A. in economics from Virginia Military Institute and his law degree from the University of Texas. He was a trial attorney for 12 years in Texas. In 1987, Hornberger left the practice of law to become director of programs at the Foundation for Economic Education in Irvington-on-Hudson, New York, publisher of The Freeman.

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In 1989, Hornberger founded the Future of Freedom Foundation. He is a regular writer for the foundation's publication, Freedom Daily. Fluent in Spanish and conversant in Italian, he has delivered speeches and engaged in debates and discussions about free-market principles with groups all over the United States, as well as Canada, England, Europe, and Latin America, including Brazil, Cuba, Bolivia, Mexico, Costa Rica, and Argentina.

He has also advanced freedom and free markets on talk-radio stations all across the country, as well as on Fox News' Neil Cavuto and Greta van Susteren shows. Most recently, he has regularly appeared as a commentator on the Internet show Freedom Watch of Fox News' legal commentator Judge Andrew Napolitano. He was interviewed by William F. Jasper at the LibertyPAC conference in Reno, Nevada, on September 15, 2011, at the video recording booth of liberty news network and the John birch society.

The New American: We 're pleased to be here at LibertyPAC in Reno, Nevada, for the 2011 conference, and very glad to have Jacob Hornberger with us today. First of all, what is the Future of Freedom Foundation?

Jacob Hornberger; We are a libertarian educational foundation and our mission is to present an uncompromising case for the libertarian philosophy, or individual liberty, free markets, and limited government. What we do is take the burning issues of the day and analyze those issues in the context of libertarian principles so that people can see that, hey, there really is a practical side to a particular economic or political philosophy known as libertarianism.

TNA: You are referring to libertarianism with a small "1," not directly related to the Libertarian Party, but as a libertarian philosophy, correct? And you find this philosophy consistent with the Founding Fathers and with our founding document, the Constitution?

Hornberger: Absolutely ... we're in the ideas business, trying to move America to a better road that's consistent with the vision of the Founding Fathers, that expounds on the principles of the Declaration of Independence, that takes the principles of the Constitution and tries to build on those in terms of where we've gone wrong in this country, with socialism, imperialism, the interven-tionism, and show Americans that the way to get back on this road is you go back to these founding principles and you apply them in terms of what's going on today. That's what we're doing.

TNA: You write about and speak about the problems that we have today with the warfare state and the welfare state. Briefly describe your ideas on both of these.

Hornberger: It is two halves of a problem. You've got the welfare state problem, which is essentially the socialist system where the government's taking money from one group of people in order to give it to another group of people. So you have this massive confiscation and redistributive program put together by the IRS that consists of things like Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, education grants, farm subsidies, aid to foreign dictatorships; it's a massive major turn from the direction that America was on. It originated near the beginning the 20th century with the Federal Reserve and the adoption of the 16th Amendment, the income tax amendment, but it came into full bloom during the regime of Franklin Roosevelt, where the primary purpose of the federal government became to confiscate wealth and to redistribute it. …

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