Swap Cheddar for Edam and Snickers for a Flake and You Could Lose Two Stone in a Year

Daily Mail (London), January 11, 2012 | Go to article overview

Swap Cheddar for Edam and Snickers for a Flake and You Could Lose Two Stone in a Year


Byline: Sean Poulter Consumer Affairs Editor

IF the idea of slaving away at the gym, cutting out carbs or eating nothing but soup leaves you grabbing a chocolate bar in despair, this could be the weightloss solution for you.

Making subtle changes to your weekly shop could help you lose more than two stone in a year, research has revealed.

Simply swapping items such as cheddar for edam cheese, corned beef for ham and korma curry for rogan josh could reduce weekly calorie intake significantly, according to a study by the team behind Men's Health magazine.

They analysed the nutritional value of 42 similar supermarket products and divided them into two baskets.

Substituting a single serving of the lower calorie option for each of the 'normal' 42 items in the basket would add up to a calorie saving of 2,205 in a week, they said.

The researchers said that such a reduction every week would lead to a weight saving of more than two and a half pounds a month.

Over a full year, the team said it would be possible to reduce the weight gain effect of what many people consider a normal diet by 30lb, or just over two stone.

Government experts recommend that women, on average, should eat no more than 2,079 calories a day, while the figure for men is 2,605. …

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Swap Cheddar for Edam and Snickers for a Flake and You Could Lose Two Stone in a Year
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