State Environmental Health Programs Vary Widely, ASTHO Survey Finds

By Johnson, Teddi Dineley | The Nation's Health, January 2012 | Go to article overview

State Environmental Health Programs Vary Widely, ASTHO Survey Finds


Johnson, Teddi Dineley, The Nation's Health


DESPITE SHRINKING budgets, the responsibilities of some state environmental health professionals have expanded to address new issues, according to a recent survey from the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials.

More than half of state environmental health directors added new environmental health activities to their programs in the past three years--many in response to legislative mandates, according to ASTHO's 2010 state environmental health directors' survey. The new activities include enforcing smoking bans and overseeing surveillance of harmful algal blooms and occupational health. In addition to new activities, more than 75 percent of state environmental health programs continue to include traditional environmental health activities such as food and public water supply protection and environmental monitoring. Additionally, a large majority of state environmental health programs provide important activities such as childhood lead poisoning prevention, environmental health risk assessment and recreational water protection.

"State environmental health programs are very diverse," said ASTHO Senior Director of Environmental Health Kerry Wyss, MEM, who discussed the survey results at APHA's 139th Annual Meeting in November. "Prior to 2006, there was very little information known on what environmental health services are consistent across the states."

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

In 2006, ASTHO gained an initial snapshot of environmental health services across the states when it administered its first survey to state environmental health directors. Enhanced and re-administered in June 2010, the latest survey includes 48 respondents from 47 states and one territory. States were asked to provide information about 17 environmental health programs, Wyss said, as well as to answer questions about funding sources, workforce, emerging issues and relevant legislative developments.

The results of the 2010 survey point to a wide variability in environmental health program responsibility from state to state. In many cases, the state health agency shares environmental health program responsibilities with different state agencies. According to the data, the number of environmental health programs administered by state environmental health directors ranges from four to 16 and averages between 10 and 11; the number of environmental health programs administered by state health agencies ranges from six to 17 and averages 13; and the number of environmental health programs administered by other state agencies ranges from zero to 15 but averages between seven and eight. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

State Environmental Health Programs Vary Widely, ASTHO Survey Finds
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.