She'll Rough You Up

By Stern, Marlow | Newsweek, January 23, 2012 | Go to article overview

She'll Rough You Up


Stern, Marlow, Newsweek


Byline: Marlow Stern

Move over, Angelina. Gina Carano is the latest female warrior to grace the big screen.

Ewan McGregor is shaking in his boots. "You shouldn't think of her as being a woman--that would be a mistake," he warns in Steven Soderbergh's new spy thriller, Haywire. The object of his anger is vengeful Mallory Kane, played by Gina Carano. A man fearing a woman? It wasn't always this way.

When James Cagney smashed a grapefruit into the face of his sulking girlfriend, played by Mae Clarke, in the 1931 gangster saga The Public Enemy, audiences didn't think twice about his woman-mauling ways.

Fast-forward to the early 1970s, when the rise of second-wave feminism spurned a backlash against "dominant cinema" portraying women as objects of male sexual desire or physical aggression.

According to filmmaker and rabid cineaste Quentin Tarantino, the female action hero was born with Pam Grier, who embodied seductive, revenge-seeking badasses in '70s blaxploitation films Coffy and Foxy Brown. James Cameron took it one step further with androgynous-looking heroine Ellen Ripley in Aliens, and the trend continues, from Uma Thurman's vengeful samurai in Kill Bill up to a new warrior princess in Pixar's Brave, out in June.

But now the evolution of the female action hero is taking a giant leap forward. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

She'll Rough You Up
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.