Art Attacks; DARING THEFTS ON PAINTINGS THAT STUNNED THE WORLD

The Mirror (London, England), January 20, 2012 | Go to article overview

Art Attacks; DARING THEFTS ON PAINTINGS THAT STUNNED THE WORLD


Byline: RORY TEVLIN

THE theft of millions of euros worth of art in a daring heist has left cops baffled.

A brazen gang plundered the collection of a retired vicar in Co Armagh, making off with near-priceless Canaletto paintings.

It is believed they used a smart phone to send images of the paintings to a third man to identify the most valuable.

The PSNI and Garda are working together to nail the gang that took the multi-million stash.

High-profile art thefts are not common as it is very difficult to sell on priceless works.

Here we look at the major heists that have shocked people across the world.

THE ISABELLA STEWART GARDNER MUSEUM RAID, BOSTON, 1990

THIS spectacular robbery in the US on March 18, 1990, still remains unsolved.

Two men dressed as police officers stole 13 priceless paintings by Vermeer, Monet and Degas in a daring raid in the early hours of the morning.

A multi-million dollar reward has been put up to recover the artwork, that is estimated to be worth more than EUR400million today.

The theft has been linked to notorious gangster Whitey Bulger but the crimelord and his associates have always denied the link.

THE EMIL GEORGE BUEHRLE THEFT, ZURICH, 2008

THE theft of works by Vincent Van Gogh, Paul Cezanne and Edgar Degas left the art world stunned in February 2008.

seven minutes to clean o ings The three-man gang in Switzerland took just seven minutes to clean out four paintings valued at around EUR70million.

The masked gunmen struck in broad daylight after waiting for visitors to leave an exhibition.

Police believe the raid on the collection of the late Swiss industrialist Emil George Buehrle was ordered by an art lover in the underworld. George lover

VAN GOGH MUSEUM, AMSTERDAM, 1991

THIS is both one of the largest and most short-lived major art robberies.

Gunmen raided the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam in April 1991, plundering 20 paintings by Van Gogh. …

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