Al Sharpton vs Herman Cain: In November, before Herman Cain's Campaign Ran into Trouble, He Exhausted the Patience of the African-American Civil Rights Activist and Preacher, Rev Al Sharpton (Pictured), Forcing Him to Tell the Republican Man What He Really, Really Thought about Black Men like Him. below Is Sharpton's Message to Cain

By Sharpton, Al | New African, January 2012 | Go to article overview

Al Sharpton vs Herman Cain: In November, before Herman Cain's Campaign Ran into Trouble, He Exhausted the Patience of the African-American Civil Rights Activist and Preacher, Rev Al Sharpton (Pictured), Forcing Him to Tell the Republican Man What He Really, Really Thought about Black Men like Him. below Is Sharpton's Message to Cain


Sharpton, Al, New African


THE GREETING ON YOUR WEBSITE says, " We arc looking forward to hearing from you", but I'm not sure you will be looking forward to hearing from me, Mr Cain.

I saw on the internet that you called the President [Barack Obama] a liar. I deplore what you are doing and the things you are saying about the President in order to gain favour with these greedy, thieving, selfish, Republicans.

How dare you call President Obama a liar? You are a pathetic, obviously brainwashed black man who has lost his way and his mind. You have had opportunity and a smattering of privilege in America that have made you forget your roots. I despise people like you and Clarence Thomas, and you both have Georgia roots.

What is it with you black men from the south who grow up in an oppressed environment and end up siding with the oppressor? The recent case of Troy Davis in Georgia is an excellent example of the present-day oppression and legal lynching that still takes place in that state and in this country.

The political party that you praise so highly is presently enacting laws to suppress the black vote, the student vote, and many elderly voters across this entire country. Yet, you choose to stand with people who display such obscene and un-American behaviour. You would throw black people (including the President of the US) and others under the bus to curry favour with these non-caring and hedonistic people.

You were there when your Republican cohorts cheered about the death penalty which disproportionately affects black men and women in this country - some of whom have been proven to be innocent.

You should be ashamed to stand with these people and yet, you appear to be proud of such an association.

Yes, President Obama does believe in fairness and sharing the responsibility of the tax burden, it is not socialism nor is it class warfare, and he is not a liar for saying it. …

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Al Sharpton vs Herman Cain: In November, before Herman Cain's Campaign Ran into Trouble, He Exhausted the Patience of the African-American Civil Rights Activist and Preacher, Rev Al Sharpton (Pictured), Forcing Him to Tell the Republican Man What He Really, Really Thought about Black Men like Him. below Is Sharpton's Message to Cain
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