STRESS MAKES YOU FAT; Obesity Epidemic as Adults Turn to Food during the Tough Times

The Mirror (London, England), January 24, 2012 | Go to article overview

STRESS MAKES YOU FAT; Obesity Epidemic as Adults Turn to Food during the Tough Times


Byline: MAEVE QUIGLEY

STRESS is the biggest cause of overeating for more than half the country's adults.

With two thirds of adults overweight, a study by iReach for Slender has shown the more anxious you feel the more likely you are to reach for a chocolate bar.

And 58.5% of us eat to try to make ourselves feel better - not worrying about our expanding waistlines.

Orla Walsh, a dietician and author from Dublin Nutrition Centre, said people are using food as a coping mechanism in these tough times.

She added: "Today's fast-paced and stressful life has given rise to alarming stress levels, and people are seeking any way they can find to cope. From this research we see emotional eating is the single biggest cause of poor dietary habits in Ireland and 58% of adults turn to food and 45% of young people to alcohol to self-medicate for stress.

"Irish people are turning to chocolate, sweets, cakes and fast food - high fat and low nutrition.

"Poor eating behaviour leads to weight gain and obesity and the psychological aspects of this need to be fully investigated if we are to address the fact six out of 10 adults are either obese or overweight."

Women are more prone to emotional overeating with 69% admitting they eat something when they are stressed while for men it's only 48%. …

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STRESS MAKES YOU FAT; Obesity Epidemic as Adults Turn to Food during the Tough Times
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