Rollers Really Are in Vogue; Dawn Collinson Finds That Liverpool Girls Are Turning Heads in Europe's Fashion Capital

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), January 24, 2012 | Go to article overview

Rollers Really Are in Vogue; Dawn Collinson Finds That Liverpool Girls Are Turning Heads in Europe's Fashion Capital


IN style circles, names don't come any more revered than Vogue. It is, quite simply, the world's ultimate fashion authority and with influence comes power; the power to make or break.

So to bring Italian Vogue from its impeccably groomed home in Milan to Liverpool and invite its opinion could have been a risky strategy.

But that's exactly what The Mersey Partnership and VisitLiverpool did to showcase the city's culture, heritage, architecture, music and fashion to journalists from Europe's couture capital.

And their verdict? It's amore ... especially the girls in rollers.

Stefania Cubello, who writes for UomoVogue.it, admits she couldn't quite believe her eyes when she first saw them.

"I met a lot of women with hair that reminded me of Amy Winehouse," she laughs, "very high and with big curls still in.

"I would not expect to see that in Milan, not now anyway, but maybe next season every woman will have that kind of hair! Why not?" Stefania was one of four writers and photographers who came to Liverpool on a three-day visit, organised in conjunction with VisitBritain Italy.

The aim of the sales mission, as Pam Wilsher from The Mersey Partnership explains, was to help generate media interest abroad.

"Attracting exposure for Liverpool in UomoVogue (Vogue Italy) is a great coup," she adds, "not only for the city to be seen as a vibrant visitor destination, but as an opportunity to highlight the thriving creative pool of talent for which it is famous."

Central in that pool, of course, is Liverpool's fashion industry.

So stops on the itinerary included not only the usual waterfront sights, museums and galleries, but Cricket in Cavern Walks, designer Kirsty Doyle and accessories specialists Nook & Willow, aka Clare Wilson and Nina Halliwell.

"Stefania's first words were she didn't think there was more to Liverpool than The Beatles," smiles Kirsty.

"I asked her what she thought about the way Liverpool girls dressed and I think she was speechless, she'd never seen anything quite like it - girls in full-on high heels and rollers in when it was teeming down with rain on a Tuesday!

"But I think she was fascinated by our style, and she was certainly very complimentary about our lookbook and what we'd done."

Over at Cricket, owner Justine Mills is no stranger to the big-hitting fashion glossies - she's featured in American Vogue and international Grazia - and she says the opportunity to have Liverpool endorsed by the Vogue brand is potentially priceless.

"I'm proud of the city and we want people to come here and see us as a retail destination," says Justine. …

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