Santorum Derangement Syndrome; Candidate Gets Sarah Palin Treatment for Cherishing Disabled Children

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 25, 2012 | Go to article overview

Santorum Derangement Syndrome; Candidate Gets Sarah Palin Treatment for Cherishing Disabled Children


Byline: Daniel Allott, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

There are, roughly speaking, three types of socially conservative politicians. There are those with conservative records on issues such as marriage and the sanctity of human life, and there are those who are also outspoken about the defense of these institutions and values.

Then there are those conservatives who also boldly live the values they espouse. Sarah Palin, as the mother of a child with Down syndrome, is one of them.

As a result, from the moment she burst onto the national political scene in August 2008 as the Republican vice-presidential nominee, Mrs. Palin became the target of a special kind of hatred and ridicule from the left.

Some of the attacks had eugenic overtones. One left-wing journalist accused Mrs. Palin of wanting to spread Down syndrome. A prominent obstetrician voiced his concern that her decision would persuade other mothers to choose life for their unborn babies with disabilities. Others interpreted her outspokenness on disability and the right to life as a ploy to win votes.

Like Mrs. Palin, former Sen. Rick Santorum is a conviction conservative who's unafraid to talk about his views on social issues, even, or perhaps especially, to hostile audiences. Also like Mrs. Palin, Mr. Santorum lives his values with an audacity that has attracted the left's unrelenting and, at times, deranged contempt.

Rick Santorum and his wife, Karen, are the parents of seven children, two of whom were born with severe disabilities. In 1996, Karen gave birth to Gabriel, a son the couple knew had a fatal genetic condition and would likely die shortly after birth.

Gabriel lived two hours outside the womb. The morning after his birth and death, the Santorums took Gabriel home so his siblings could meet him. Elizabeth and Johnny held you with so much love and tenderness, Karen, a former neonatal intensive care unit nurse, wrote in Letters to Gabriel, a series of letters she wrote to Gabriel that were published as a book in 1998. Elizabeth proudly announced to everyone as she cuddled you, 'This is my baby brother, Gabriel; he is an angel.'"

I recently wrote a piece on the growing perinatal hospice movement, in which parents of babies likely to die during or soon after birth are given support and advice on how to cope with, care and grieve for their baby, as well as how to tell family members and others about the diagnosis.

The experience is obviously very difficult. But I learned that giving birth to a child with a fatal condition can also be profoundly rewarding - a way to validate, honor and celebrate a baby's life no matter how frail or how brief. As one mother of a child who died a few hours after birth put it, [My daughter's] life and death showed me clearly that life can be lived fully and completely in the space of a few minutes.

In 2008, Karen gave birth to Bella, a daughter born with Trisomy 18, a genetic disorder that causes severe intellectual and physical disabilities. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Santorum Derangement Syndrome; Candidate Gets Sarah Palin Treatment for Cherishing Disabled Children
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.