New Sex Education Guidelines Released

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 25, 2012 | Go to article overview

New Sex Education Guidelines Released


Byline: Kimberly Hefling AP Education Writer

WASHINGTON -- Young elementary school students should use the proper names for body parts and, by the end of fifth grade, know that sexual orientation is "the romantic attraction of an individual to someone of the same gender or a different gender," according to new sexual education guidelines released this month by a coalition of health and education groups.

The non-binding recommendations to states and school districts seek to encourage age-appropriate discussions about sex, bullying and healthy relationships -- starting with a foundation even before second grade.

By presenting minimum standards that schools can use to formulate school curriculums for each age level, the groups hope that schools can build a sequential foundation that in the long term will better help teens as they grow into adults.

Experts say schools across America are inconsistent in how they address such sensitive topics.

Despite awareness of bullying, for example, Debra Hauser, president of Advocates for Youth, one of the groups involved with creating the standards, said some schools don't address it -- or at least not in relation to sexual orientation or gender identity, which is where she said a lot of the bullying occurs.

"They should tackle it head on," Hauser said.

Other organizations involved with the release include the American Association of Health Education, the American School Health Association, the National Education Association-Health Information Network, the Society of State Leaders of Health and Physical Education, and the Future of Sex Education Initiative. The latest suggestions were already drawing less enthusiastic reactions from some.

By the end of second grade, students should use the correct body part names, the guidelines say, and also understand that all living things reproduce and that all people have the right to not be touched if they don't want to be. They also say young elementary school kids should be able to identity different kinds of family structures and explain why bullying and teasing are wrong. …

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